Wilton Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Wilton Golf Club

About Wilton Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Wilton Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Wilton Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Wilton Golf Club

Formed in 1952 as part of ICI Wilton’s Recreation Club, golf matches in those days had to be played on other courses as the Club did not have a Golf Course. The first Captain was Dr. J. W. Armit who was Chairman of Wilton Works. In 1954 work started on the construction of a nine-hole golf course and a well known golf architect, Mr. J. F. S. Morrison, of Colt Allison & Morrison was employed to design the layout. Thirty years previously he had been involved in the design of Brancepeth Golf Course. The course was to be constructed on parkland in front of Wilton Castle and to be financed by ICI.

Wilton Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

The direction that the putter is moving at the moment of impact has very little influence on the starting direction of a putt: Assuming you make contact on the putter’s sweetspot the degree of influence is only about 17 percent (Figure 4.6.1). That means if the putterface is square to the intended starting line and the putter moves across that line at a 10-degree angle as it makes contact the ball will start only 1.7 degrees off-line (17 percent times 10 degrees equals 1.7 degrees).

So you can make a large error in your stroke path and see only a small error in the starting line of your putt. Another way to think of it is this: On a dead-straight five-foot putt your path could travel along a line aimed 13 inches left of the hole center and the ball would still hit the left edge (Figure 4.6.2) assuming you hit the sweetspot and everything else about your stroke was perfect.

As you will see in section 4.8 putterface angle has more effect on the line a pull starts on than does the putter path. But golfers practice putter path because

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 73 it’s easier for them to see their friends (from whom they take advice) can see it and they don’t know what else to practice. I guess it’s not too hard to understand why their putting doesn’t improve.

The Screen Door

For many years Harvey Penick one the game’s greatest teachers taught that the putter should swing open on the backswing and swing closed on the follow-through like a screen door as it moved around a player ‘s body (Figure 4.6.3). He believed that the natural stroke path should move to the inside on the backswing (around a motionless body) and back to the inside on the follow-through. He taught many golfers to become great players including my good friends Tom Kite and Ben Crenshaw and his screen-door concept has been the generally accepted way to putt throughout most of the 50 years I’ve been playing this game.

Wilton Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Lower-Body Motion and Looking

Almost all golfers unknowingly move their bodies during the putting stroke. Sometimes a lot usually just a little but almost always some which tells me it must be extremely difficult to eliminate (at least without hours and hours of practice). Try rotating your lower body around your spine in your putting address position and you will see it turns your upper body as well (especially your shoulders arms and putter) because your upper body is sitting on the lower (Figure 4.10.18). This also rotates your putterface angle adding an unknown uncontrollable and unwanted variable to the starting line of your putts.

Rotation isn’t the only lower-body motion to avoid. Some golfers sway back and forth as they putt (Figure 4.10.19). They probably don’t know they’re doing it but the ball doesn’t care what you do or don’t know. One forward inch of sway during a stroke will move your ball about one foot on the green. And that ‘s a foot you probably did not plan on.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 107

A different kind of move is the “peek ” in which the golfer both turns and looks up in the middle of his stroke in an attempt to see the result. Probably the most famous peek was at the 1970 British Open at St. Andrews when Doug Sanders (Figure 4.10.20) missed a 2½-foot putt to drop into a tie with Jack Nicklaus who then beat him in the playoff.

4.11 Putter Fitting

Proper putter fitting is not fundamentally a part of putting stroke mechanics but there’s no doubt that it can help you make better strokes. If the length or lie of a putter is wrong for you you’ll be forced to make compensations in order to putt at all well (Figure 4.11.1). And every characteristic of your putter that is poorly fit to your body size shape setup posture or alignment is one more card stacked against the odds of your executing a pure accurate smooth and noncompensating stroke.

Wilton Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Wilton Golf Club

Hold the club steady with your right hand, and place left hand underneath the club as shown. The first joint of the left forefinger should be directly on the bottom of the handle, as well as the last joint of your left pinky. Once you have placed your palm on top of the club, do the same with your left thumb. Place it directly on top of the handle of the club. Next, interlock the left forefinger, and the right pinky. Nudge your right hand all the way towards the bottom of the grip. Now again, wrap the right palm all the way around the top of the grip. Don’t hold the grip of the club in your right palm. You should be able to cover up your left thumb with your right palm if you’ve done it correctly. You’ll see another V-shape being made where your right thumb and right forefinger meet. As a check, this V should be pointing directly at your right shoulder. If it doesn’t point at your right shoulder, rotate your hand on the grip so that it does. Your fingers should be giving the club most of the support it needs, NOT your palms.

Wilton Golf Club