Widnes Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Widnes Golf Club

About Widnes Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Widnes Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Widnes Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Widnes Golf Club

Golf was first played in Widnes during the early years of the twentieth century on the land bordered by Moorfield Road and Bowers Brook, known locally as the ‘Bongs”.Here the early enthusiasts cut holes and marked out teeing grounds.The first Golf Club was formed and a nine-hole Course laid out in the grounds of Ditchfield Hall, Hough Green, in approximately 1902. It appears that the club ceased to function during the First World War, and attempts to revive it after the war soon failed.The Clubhouse still exists and is put to good use by the Members of the Hough Green Mens Club. The ninth green also lives on, forming the garden of a house once owned by one of our former Members, Dr J Chestnutt. Another link with the original Golf Club is that with the proposal to form a Widnes Golf Club several Hough Green members gave their enthusiastic support to the idea, notably Dr.(later Sir) G C Clayton, at one time Chairman of the United Alkali Company and MP for Widnes, who became the first President.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

It takes a talented athlete like Chi Chi to swing his putter to the left while holding the face open to the right and successfully make his ball go straight. But even he couldn’t do it all the time which is why I think he would have won quite a few more tournaments had he grooved and owned a simpler stroke. (Don’t think the cut stroke spins putts enough to make them slice across the green. The friction of the grass takes all spin off of putts the same as with hook-stroke putts.)

Another unusual – I wouldn’t go so far as to call it unique – putting style was put to good use for many years by Billy Casper. He locked his arms against his stomach and powered his putts purely by hinging his wrists (Figure 3.5.7). Once again Casper no longer uses this method and steers others away from it saying that it took far more time patience and practice to keep sharp than the pendulum stroke that is now popular among Tour pros.

However in his behalf I have to say that Billy won a lot of tournaments putting with his wrists so you know it can be done. I caution you though that you will have to devote yourself to hours and hours of practice for years and years and also play under enough pressure to learn how to handle the effects of adrenaline the way he did.

The Block Stroke Here’s a method that sounds almost ridiculous: Aim the putterface a foot to the left of your target on a straight putt then block the ball toward the hole. That’s what Lee Trevino has done throughout his career (Figure 3.5.8).

Methods of Putting 47 “block-strokes” better than Lee Trevino.

Every part of Lee’s game is built on aiming to the left then blocking his swing through impact so it’s little surprise he does this when putting too. In my opinion Trevino is another great player who achieved greatness in spite of his putting not because of it. And he agrees: Lee told me that if he had putted as well as Jack Nicklaus you might never have heard of the Golden Bear.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Despite these conditions using slightly more loft might help explain why my man Jack Lemmon (the “human hinge”) always putts so well in that tournament (Figure 4.10.3). (Peter Jacobsen eat your heart out!)

The angle between your back and your hips should be great enough to provide room for your arms to swing with your hands vertically below your shoulders but small enough to let you comfortably practice putting at least 10 or 15 minutes at a time (Figure 4.10.4 middle photograph). Your knees should be slightly flexed enough to give you stability on windy days without making you feel crouched or uncomfortable.

The most comfortable and solid putting posture sets your center of mass (the center of your weight) over a spot between the balls of your feet as shown in Figure 4.10.5. Leaning too far forward so your weight gets out over your toes can cause severe inconsistencies in the impact point of your putts. Leaning too far back away from the ball places too much weight on your heels which leads to instability particularly in windy conditions again hindering solid and repeatable impact.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 97

Eye Position

Once your posture is correct as described above position your eyes somewhere directly over the Aimline of your putt as discussed in section 4.4. Accomplish this by moving closer to or farther away from the ball – not by changing your back angle or leaning over or hack. Remember the Aimline extends behind the hall so it’s okay to set your eyes slightly behind the ball Jack Nicklaus – style (Figure 4.10.6).

One word of realism here: Positioning your eyes over your Aimline won’t make you aim perfectly but it will allow you to aim consistently. If you learn how to aim perfectly (in Chapter 11) by eliminating compensations for your stroke faults then consistently perfect aim will become automatic.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Widnes Golf Club

At the end of step two, you reached the top of your backswing. As soon, as you get there, start your downswing. As you start the downswing, make sure to remind yourself to keep your arms “connected” to your chest and shoulders. Stay connected all the way through the ball. Your hands and arms only swing as the shoulders rotate. If you start your downswing by rotating your chest, without starting to swing your arms, you will most definitely end up slicing the ball. If you swing your arms before rotating your chest, you will most likely hook the ball. Staying connected will always produce the straightest ball.

Widnes Golf Club