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Golf Lessons at Wharton Park Golf Club

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Golf Lessons at Wharton Park Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Wharton Park Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Wharton Park Golf Club

Wharton Park Golf Club is a high quality 18-hole golf course, situated within and surrounded by beautiful Worcestershire countryside. You will find our facilities are extensive and of a high standard, but above all you will find a warm welcome and real emphasis on good hospitiality. Wharton Park Golf Club offer a range of options for the ideal golfing corporate day out. We welcome club societies and you can use our website to book your golfing day out NOW!

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Lower-Body Motion and Looking

Almost all golfers unknowingly move their bodies during the putting stroke. Sometimes a lot usually just a little but almost always some which tells me it must be extremely difficult to eliminate (at least without hours and hours of practice). Try rotating your lower body around your spine in your putting address position and you will see it turns your upper body as well (especially your shoulders arms and putter) because your upper body is sitting on the lower (Figure 4.10.18). This also rotates your putterface angle adding an unknown uncontrollable and unwanted variable to the starting line of your putts.

Rotation isn’t the only lower-body motion to avoid. Some golfers sway back and forth as they putt (Figure 4.10.19). They probably don’t know they’re doing it but the ball doesn’t care what you do or don’t know. One forward inch of sway during a stroke will move your ball about one foot on the green. And that ‘s a foot you probably did not plan on.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 107

A different kind of move is the “peek ” in which the golfer both turns and looks up in the middle of his stroke in an attempt to see the result. Probably the most famous peek was at the 1970 British Open at St. Andrews when Doug Sanders (Figure 4.10.20) missed a 2½-foot putt to drop into a tie with Jack Nicklaus who then beat him in the playoff.

4.11 Putter Fitting

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 69 in such a way that the adrenaline-affected muscles of your fingers hands and wrists don’t control how far or fast your putts roll. You’ll learn about that in section 13.5.

Forearm Rotation

Just about every shot in golf except putting requires rotation of the forearms through the impact zone. But apply that same rotation to your putting stroke and you’ll produce double trouble. First your putterface will rotate from open to closed so the likelihood that it is square at the moment of impact becomes very small. Second forearm rotation supplies unwanted and unnecessary power and usually a lot of it.

But there’s yet another problem with forearm rotation: it feels natural. Even Tour professionals don’t realize they’re doing it and when I tell them to stop they usually say “What do you mean I’m not rotating my arms! ” But of course they are. And like the pros most golfers don’ t mean to do it and if you ask them don’t think they are. But they are and you probably are too. Which is too bad because forearm rotation makes putting more difficult more inconsistent and less effective.

You’ll have to wait until Chapter 13 to learn how to stop rotating your forearms. For now however make a mental note that you will stop making this destructive motion. It will be one of your challenges in improving your putting and a crucial one.

Body Power

In the previous chapter I talked about body putting something rarely seen among the pros because it’s a bad thing to do. Your body is large and the big muscles of the chest back and legs are strong particularly when compared to the small amounts of power needed to roll a ball on the fast surface of a putting green. Still many golfers put too much of their body into the stroke rotating the lower body sliding the lower body toward the hole or moving the upper body away from the hole (Figure 4.5.2). All these motions are unintentional (at least I hope so) but they still produce unwanted power and directional instability.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Wharton Park Golf Club

Notice that the right elbow becomes locked now as the right arm continues to swing. As you can see the right wrist has started to roll on top of the left wrist. The left elbow is now closer to the body, and is able to bend. The left elbow cannot be completely stopped at the imaginary line, but just a hesitation is enough to let your hands swing through the ball. Notice that the triangle is still present.

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