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Golf Lessons at Weston Park Golf Club

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Golf Lessons at Weston Park Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Weston Park Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Weston Park Golf Club

Weston Park combines a magnificent parkland setting and a tranquil environment with an elegant clubhouse, which has been caringly converted to provide an unrivalled venue for golf, weddings, conferences, business meetings, corporate and social events.Tucked away in the heart of rural Norfolk, Weston Park, one of Norfolk’s premier golf clubs, offers a fine golf course and clubhouse, and provides high quality service and facilities for societies, weddings, events and special occasions. With the beautiful parkland landscape, and peaceful surroundings Weston Park provides a perfect venue for every occasion.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

You’ll have to wait until Chapter 13 to learn how to stop rotating your forearms. For now however make a mental note that you will stop making this destructive motion. It will be one of your challenges in improving your putting and a crucial one.

Body Power

In the previous chapter I talked about body putting something rarely seen among the pros because it’s a bad thing to do. Your body is large and the big muscles of the chest back and legs are strong particularly when compared to the small amounts of power needed to roll a ball on the fast surface of a putting green. Still many golfers put too much of their body into the stroke rotating the lower body sliding the lower body toward the hole or moving the upper body away from the hole (Figure 4.5.2). All these motions are unintentional (at least I hope so) but they still produce unwanted power and directional instability.

For example I estimate that for every inch the body moves toward the target during the putting stroke the ball moves an additional foot on the green. And rotating the lower body not only adds power it also causes the putterface to rotate from open to closed.

Putting is a game in which delicate feel and touch create exactly the right speed and break of your putts. When you’re trying to be precise body power causes nothing but trouble.

School students turn (top) slide (middle) and reverse (bottom) their bodies during their putting stroke motions.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

If you want an answer to question 2 – “How well do you putt?” – you must measure your percentage of putts holed from each distance. You can do this but it will take some effort. You have to record the distance of each putt on your scorecard as you move around the course and indicate those you hole. After 10 to 15

Problems on the Greens 29 rounds (and at least 5 to 10 putts from each distance) you’ll begin to be able to plot your own conversion chart and compare it to those of the pros.

As for question 3 – “How good can one get at putting?” – the answer depends on a number of things: the quality of the greens how well a player reads those greens and the quality of the player’s stroke and touch. Although none of these questions can be answered definitively in this book I assure you that all of the above are getting better all the time. As greens improve putting strokes improve and golfers learn to read greens better a higher percentage of putts from every distance will be made in the future.

Finally “Flow good will your putting be in the future?” That depends on your ability to learn the mechanics of a better putting stroke your ability to learn better putting feel and touch your ability to learn to read greens better and your ability to produce the right stroke at the right time. Depending on your lifestyle your determination and intensity your focus your self-discipline and practice habits and your ability to learn only you can provide this answer.

For most golfers to improve their scores it is often easier to reduce their number of three-putts than it is to increase their number of one-putts. This is generally true for golfers with handicaps greater than 20 although it is even true for some very fine lower-handicap players. As you can see in Figure 2.9.1 the length of the most frequent first putt on greens hit from outside 60 yards is 38 feet. (This distance varies a little with the handicap of the players measured but obviously there are many more long first putts than short ones.) This figure also shows that the most frequent first putt to follow shots hit from inside 60 yards is an 18-footer. If you combine these two curves and add in all the second and third putts that become necessary after the first putt is missed you can see a typical value for the number of putts of each length golfers face per round over a season of golf (Figure 2.9.2).

Now look at the conversion curve for this group of 15- to 25-handicap golfers (Figure 2.9.3) and the frequency with which they three-putt versus the putt distance (Figure 2.9.4). By comparing these data you can see the importance of making short putts as well as learning that you can save several strokes per round by eliminating three-putts from outside 30 feet. This means that you shouldn’t practice only short putts; the long ones are also important. And you must stop three-putting those long ones if you want to be a good putter.

For those not familiar with “lag putting ” some explanations:

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Weston Park Golf Club

The chest and shoulders shouldn’t be turning, unless your arms are turning with them. In other words, you want to start your swing with a shoulder turn, but your arms should start swinging at EXACTLY the same time. They are an extension. They are connected. Furthermore, your arms shouldn’t be swinging unless your chest is rotating. Don’t start swinging your arms without starting the shoulder turn. They are connected. Your left elbow remains locked throughout the entire swing. When you complete your shoulder turn, your arms should stop as well. The goal will be to have your left arm exactly parallel to the ground. Your elbow is still locked. When it gets there…STOP. Do not continue to swing your arms.

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