West Hove Golf Club

Golf Lessons at West Hove Golf Club

About West Hove Golf Club

Golf Lessons at West Hove Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit West Hove Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

West Hove Golf Club

Founded in 1910, the Club was situated on the boundary between Hove and Portslade. However, in 1991, the building of the ‘Brighton by-pass’ meant the Club had to relocate and it is now in the midst of the South Downs, in an area of outstanding natural beauty which may soon be designated a National Park. The 18-hole golf course is laid out over rolling chalk downland and is a challenging par 70. Being in one of the warmest and driest parts of the country, coupled with the chalk terrain, the course is always playable.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

But speed? Well that ‘s different. Every putt is a new experience. You ‘ve never putted this exact putt under these conditions at your present age at this exact moment before. You’ve never faced exactly this break on exactly this green at this green speed at precisely this distance from the hole. And because everything is new controlling the speed of your puns will always require every bit of your focus and attention. In fact ball tracks (which include your Aimlines and speeds) are just about the only thing you should think about when putting.

At the beginning of this chapter 1 said that speed is important enough to be the number-one principle in putting. Now you know why. It is the one element that you should think about with intense full-bore flat-out focus in the form of ball tracks every time you putt.

Wind Lopsided Balls Dimples Rain Sleet and Snow

9.1 Are You a Real Golfer?

I’m not asking how well you score or anything about your handicap. What I want to know is how much do you enjoy playing the game? For example when I lived in Abilene Texas about 15 years ago l played with a group of friends all of whom could be characterized as real golfers. We had a regularly scheduled game that went on come rain wind sleet or snow. The only time we didn’t play was when the wind conditions of the day failed the “chain test ” (Figure 9.1.1): If the wind wasn’t holding the chain horizontal to the ground we played. We are real golfers who love to play the game.

So let me ask you again. Are you a real golfer? If not you may want to skip this chapter because it may tell you more than you want to know about putting. I’m going to discuss how the wind your golf ball’s balance and even its dimples can affect your putting.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

It might seem about now that I’m being very negative about putting that I’m pointing out how hard it is how much you don’t know and how much you have to learn to be a good putter. I’m not trying to he negative but I am trying to point out how much you have to learn. Learning is what good putting is all about: It’s not hard to putt well; it is hard to learn how to putt well. And the difference is crucial. I place much of the blame for the difficulty in learning squarely on the putting green. The green provides a very poor environment in which to learn.

Standing on the putting green golfers have no idea why they miss putts or why they make them. After missing a putt (even on the practice green) most golfers assume their stroke mechanics were to blame. However they may have stroked a perfect putt but it hit a hard-to-see footprint which caused the putt to miss the hole. Or they might make a putt and assume they stroked it perfectly when they actually hit a terrible putt but misread it just the right amount to compensate and – only luck can explain it – roll it into the hole.

I learned a long time ago that if you learn from your mistakes things usually get better. But if you continue to repeat the same mistakes over and over again things get pretty bad. Then I read a book on learning theory and learned that immediate accurate reliable feedback is the key to efficient learning (Figure 2.7.1). This in fact has become the basis of all my teaching (I wrote about it at great length in my Short Game Bible). The basic notion is that if you don’t know right from wrong in practice there is no way you can improve. If you don’t know a good stroke from a bad stroke in practice you are just as likely to groove the bad one as the better one. If you make a perfect putting stroke from a bad setup position and then blame your miss on stroke path you’ll never learn to set up perfectly. Or if you blame your heart your courage or your self-worth when you miss putts then you’ll never fix your aim your path or the impact problems that truly are at fault.

A student in one of our Scoring Game Schools told me a story. In a laboratory devoted to the methodology of learning scientists were studying how pigeons learn to feed themselves from pellet dispensers. In one cage of pigeons they placed a number of dispensers all of which released one pellet every time a pigeon bumped or stepped on the release lever. Every time the lever was hit a pellet fell out. It took just two days for every pigeon in that cage to learn how to feed itself: hit the lever get a pellet.

There was another cage of pigeons which had the same number of identical-looking pellet dispensers. But these dispensers worked differently. They released pellets randomly. Sometimes pellets were released without the levers being touched. Sometimes they were released when the lever was touched once. And sometimes when the lever was touched nothing would happen. In time some of the pigeons thought that when they lifted their right wing a pellet was released. Some of the pigeons thought that if they chirped they would get a pellet. And some of the pigeons believed that if they turned in circles in front of the dispenser they would get a pellet. In two months none of the pigeons learned to feed themselves. In fact it was humorous watching the second cage: every pigeon practicing a different move hoping to release a pellet.

It reminds me of a practice putting green filled with golfers. One golfer is prac ticing a new grip. Another has widened his stance and is bending over more than he used to while his friend is trying the split-hand grip he saw on television. An other golfer is trying to learn a short backswing and “pop” stroke. All these golfers practicing something that they actually did just before they happened to make a putt hoping it will help them make another one.

And that is what you see if you look at many putting greens today. Golfers practicing practicing and practicing – who knows what they are practicing? – all hoping their putting will improve. Some of them practice a different thing every day and use a different stroke in every round. Some golfers even use several differ ent strokes during one round. Yes sir-ee they remind me of a bunch of pigeons!

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition West Hove Golf Club

The picture at left shows the correct setup position from above. You can see the correct shoulder turn by looking at this picture in conjunction with the picture directly below. Notice that there is no horizontal movement. There should also be no vertical movement. Everything rotates around the spine. Focus on rotating the right side of your body around your spine. The left side will move into place automatically.

West Hove Golf Club