West Hill Golf Club

Golf Lessons at West Hill Golf Club

About West Hill Golf Club

Golf Lessons at West Hill Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

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The course design is attributed to Cuthbert Butchart who became the first professional before the course was built. It has remained largely unaltered in layout but much work has gone into improving the quality of the fabric and the presentation. The watering system for the greens and tees was installed in 1981 and this has now been augmented by full state of the art fairway watering. A bunker refurbishing programme was started in 1999 and all 18 holes have reprofiled bunkers with improved drainage and carefully selected sand. Tee renovation has provided an outstanding aspect for each hole even before a shot is played. Here one can appreciate the great trees, usually far enough from the fairway, with heather intervening to provide a colourful ribbon around the semi rough.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Blaming the wrong factor has two had results. First it encourages golfers to

Speed Is More Important Than Line 181 work on the wrong parts of their game usually playing with their stroke path grip follow-through or something else that’s easy to see. Second they never work on the real problem which is learning to control speed.

It’s true: Speed itself can be hard to see. And the results of bad speed are difficult to diagnose and often go misdiagnosed. Let me show you just how big a problem this is. In testing that provided amateur golfers with the perfect aim direction on 12-foot putts that broke 4 inches we determined that 80 percent of all those that missed were due to improper speed (their line was good enough to go in with good speed). The other 20 percent of the misses were due to pushing or pulling putts far enough off-line to miss. Based on this data we teach that speed is four times more important than line. But what do golfers work on? Our research goes on to show that most golfers spend more than 90 percent of their putting practice time working on controlling their line.

8.2 Line Is Instinctive

This is another one of those times when I sympathize with golfers because their instinct – to work on line rather than speed – seems to make sense. Why? Because it is easier to see errors in line than errors in speed. Figure 8.2.1 shows three ball tracks for a straight putt rolled at the same speed but started on different Aimlines. Most golfers with any experience would probably correctly diagnose these three putts as a push one struck perfectly and a pull. It’s instinct because it’s easy to see: Ball goes right of the target it’s a push; ball goes in it’s perfect; ball goes left it ‘s a pull.

While realizing that you pulled or pushed your putt off your intended line is an instinctive and natural reaction golfers take it too far. They get overconcerned and overfocused on the direction thereby becoming what we call “line-locked” over their putts. They get so concerned about line that they forget how fast or how far the putt needs to roll. As often as not they leave putts short of the hole rolling them on-line but at the wrong speed.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

This is a point worth repeating because most golfers don’t think enough about the speed of their putts. Rather they focus on line. If you are a “line” putter try putting with a pool cue or a True Roller and I promise you’ll learn to appreciate the importance of speed in making putts.

3.3 It Gets More Difficult

So we’ve disposed of two methods that no one can or should be allowed to use. What about some techniques that have been tried and in some cases are still in use?

Croquet-Style

Next on the “easiness” scale (which means it’s a little more difficult than the techniques above) is standing so you face the putting line and putt croquet-style between your legs. Yes this really has been used. Bob Duden and Bob Shave Jr. two PGA Tour pros who had been struggling with their putting used this technique back in the 1960s. I’ve never been sure whether the USGA banned this method because it was too easy too nontraditional or it just looked bad when viewed from behind. It certainly made putting easier because it gave the golfer the best view of the line before the putt and a clear view of what the ball was doing immediately after it started to roll.

Both of these views provide critically important feedback that golfers generally miss when putting in the conventional style (that is standing to the side of the line). Croquet-style putting has other benefits: It removes all rotational motion of the forearms (which opens and closes the putterface during conventional putting) it forces the wrists to remain solid (no breakdown) and it creates the perfect in-line stroke path straight down the intended putting line.

Croquet putting is so easy that it was used by no less a legend than Sam Snead in the mid-1960s (when he was in his mid-fifties) to counter a case of the yips. Snead actually putted this way (Figure 3.3.1) – with one foot on either side of the target line – during the 1966 PGA Championship where he finished tied for sixth. Perhaps it was seeing the great Samuel Jackson Snead putt from the wrong direction or perhaps it was deemed to reduce the skill required to play the game – in any case croquet-style putting was quickly outlawed by golf’s powers that be.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition West Hill Golf Club

I want you to understand the purpose of this technique before providing the details. It’s an easy technique that will produce fantastic results. You don’t need to have a long and complicated back swing to send the ball a long way down the fairway. Try taking, what you believe to be, a half swing. The ball will go almost as far. It may not leave the clubface with the same speed, but it also will not slice 40 yards to the right. Which shot would you rather have on a golf course? The drill I’m about to teach you will help you consistently keep the ball in the fairway, and give you better accuracy with all of your clubs.

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