Walton Heath Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Walton Heath Golf Club

About Walton Heath Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Walton Heath Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Trefloyne Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Walton Heath Golf Club

The Club was founded in 1903 and the course was opened for play in May 1904. James Braid had already become the Club’s professional and was to remain in that capacity until his death in 1950. The course was laid out by W. Herbert Fowler, a leading amateur golfer. It was his first golf course venture and he went on to become one of the leading golf course architects of his era, both in the U.K. and America.It is a tribute to Fowler’s genius that he created one of the finest examples of heathland golf, which so closely resembles the traditional seaside links courses, out of a jungle of heather, gorse and bracken. It is a further testament to his creativity that the Old Course with a championship length of 7,351 yards is, still to this day, ranked as one of the top 100 courses in the world. The New Course was opened in 1907, and is comfortably ranked in the Top 100 courses in the British Isles – a superb test of golf that plays to a championship length of 7,165 yards.

Walton Heath Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

You Putt As You Prepare Yourself to Putt

In golf as in life you become what you see yourself becoming if you prepare yourself to become that way. For reasons I don’t understand golfers expect golf to be easier than it is. (Maybe they want golf to be easier than it is which I do understand.) Golfers think they can buy a better game or if they take one lesson and learn how to swing a club the game will become easy.

They expect that after they learn how to hit a shot and hit it once they should be able to do it perfectly every time for the rest of their careers. I’m sorry but that’s not golf.

Steve Elkington (Figure 15.6.1) is one of the best players I’ve ever worked with. He knows how to hit all the shots and that includes putting. But as talented as he is athletically he still practices his putting stroke and he still hits all the other shots four to six hours a day six days a week and he plays 18 holes almost every day.

Do you really think you can do your job – sitting behind a desk or behind the wheel of a car – for most of your life and expect to repeat those motions as well as Elk can? Sorry but it’s not going to happen. I teach my schools and have written this book staying loyal to my belief that dealing with the realities of the game is the best way to improve. This means having realistic expectations about your game and your possible improvement. Without question you can putt as well as Steve Elkington. But you’ve got to be willing to do what it takes to get there before you do.

384 Wrap-Up

Walton Heath Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Aim Is Learned

Aiming is easy. Everybody aims. It is aiming precisely where you want to aim that is more elusive. The fact that most golfers do a poor job of aiming is not surprising because there’s no feedback on a putting green to teach golfers how to aim properly. In the absence of feedback golfers use two inputs to guide their attempts to aim: First they use their previous putting results (what I call reaction aiming) and second they use the look of their putter relative to their Aimline (what I call position aiming). Further explanations are in order.

Reaction Aiming

The way most golfers aim is to consider past results and then align themselves and their putter to correct for stroke faults and produce the results they want. For example you miss a putt to the left and think “I pulled it ” or maybe “I aimed too far to the left.” Miss several putts left and you think “I must be aiming too far to the left.” So what do you do? You aim to the right. Pretty soon and without realizing you’ve learned to aim consistently to the right as a way of compensating for a stroke that tends to pull to the left.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 65

Data taken in my Scoring Game Schools show conclusively that reaction aiming is a learned skill that most golfers develop as a way to compensate for their putting stroke deficiencies. Players who block their strokes to the right of their Aimline learn to aim to the left of the Aimline. Players who pull their putts to the left learn to aim to the right.

Think about it: Have you ever seen golfers who block putts to the right also aim too far to the right? Of course not. They would miss putts so far to the right it would be ridiculous. They learn to aim to the left and they think this is proper because it produces better results. So the overriding influence on how golfers learn to aim is as a reaction to their results. That is reaction aiming.

Walton Heath Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Walton Heath Golf Club

Hold the club steady with your right hand, and place left hand underneath the club as shown. The first joint of the left forefinger should be directly on the bottom of the handle, as well as the last joint of your left pinky. Once you have placed your palm on top of the club, do the same with your left thumb. Place it directly on top of the handle of the club. Next, interlock the left forefinger, and the right pinky. Nudge your right hand all the way towards the bottom of the grip. Now again, wrap the right palm all the way around the top of the grip. Don’t hold the grip of the club in your right palm. You should be able to cover up your left thumb with your right palm if you’ve done it correctly. You’ll see another V-shape being made where your right thumb and right forefinger meet. As a check, this V should be pointing directly at your right shoulder. If it doesn’t point at your right shoulder, rotate your hand on the grip so that it does. Your fingers should be giving the club most of the support it needs, NOT your palms.

Walton Heath Golf Club