Walton Hall Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Walton Hall Golf Club

About Walton Hall Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Walton Hall Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Walton Hall Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Walton Hall Golf Club

The 18th Green and ClubhouseWalton Hall Golf Course in Warrington is regarded as one of the finest municipal golf courses in the North West. This web site has been developed by Walton Hall Golf Club which has active Mens, Ladies and Junior sections holding regular golf competitions throughout the year. The club operates independently of the course, the management and operation of which is under the control of the Director of Golf and Warrington Borough Council.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

That’s why you want to determine your natural putting rhythm first. And remember it.

11.4 Create and Commit to Your Ritual

As explained back in Chapter 5 putting routine and putting ritual are two different things. The routine is creating all the information and getting comfortable with the stroke. The ritual is the “get ready get set go” that creates the rhythm and cadence of your backswing and follow-through. Your ritual is actually the first part of your stroke. It is a series of physical motions – made in your natural body rhythm – that immediately precede the making of the stroke. Your ritual should always be composed of the same physical motions executed in the same sequence and at the same rhythm (therefore taking exactly the same amount of time every time) before every putt you make on and off the course (under the heat of competition as well as in all your practice).

The purpose of the ritual is to get your mind and body into the automatic (subconscious control) mode. Executing your ritual on the golf course under pressure the same way you’ve done thousands of times before on the practice green and at home on your carpet lets your subconscious know both what you’re going to do and when you’re going to do it. It removes the necessity for any thinking or decision-making before or during the execution of your stroke.

The ritual should take less than five seconds. Why? Because you will have just seen and felt your preview (perfect) stroke and you lose about 30 percent of that feel within eight seconds after creating it. (And it will have taken you about three seconds to get set in your final putting address position after finalizing your preview stroke to be ready to start your ritual.)

You Must Move Your Body

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Away from physics and hack to golf. As long as your putting triangle (Figure 4.7.7) remains intact so the elbow and wrist angles don’t change during the stroke and your forearms don’t rotate there is a position of your hands somewhere under your shoulders that will produce a pure-in-line-square stroke. This stroke is perfectly natural with no involvement of the muscles of your hands wrists or forearms. This lack of hand action is what we call a “dead-hands” stroke. (Note: The perfect vertical pendulum hand position can be influenced by the musculature of your shoulders and arms. Golfers with either very muscular or slender arms may find the spot isn’t precisely under their shoulders – but pretty close – due to the weight balance of the arms hands and putter.)

You’ve now had it proven that it is not only possible but also natural to swing your putter in a pure straight-line motion without any hand or forearm manipulations. And it’s equally possible and natural to swing your putter around or away from your body. Which stroke do you think lets you putt best? To me it’s obvious that the pure-in-line-square (pils) stroke is the simplest and best way to putt.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 83

It’s Natural

Many other accuracy-oriented sports have embraced the pure-in-line stroke motion over a screen-door path including basketball bowling croquet and shooting pool (Figure 4.7.8). In all of these skills you could hit or release the ball or object from either a straight in-line or curved (around the body) path. It should come as no surprise that the in-line path is chosen in every case because the curved path demands perfect timing of the release to achieve the desired result.

Look at the two motions for bowling: Both are perfect pendulums formed by the arm swinging from the shoulder. On the top the arm swings along the desired starting line of the ball so whether it is released a little early a little late or at the perfect time it always starts in the proper direction. In the lower figure the arm is swung out and around the body so only a perfectly timed release will start the ball rolling in the desired direction. The same comparison for shot accuracy is valid in croquet basketball pool and putting.

So does any golfer want to move the putter or aim the putterface in any direction other than the desired starting line of the putt at the moment of impact? Of course not! Yet some golfers think they can achieve the perfect path through impact by using a screen-door stroke which rotates around their bodies. They obviously don’t realize that the timing of impact (and ball position) must be perfect every time if they hope to have a chance of holing any putts. And they don’t realize that the in-line-square stroke motion minimizes the effects of inconsistencies in timing and ball position.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Walton Hall Golf Club

Please start with the three pictures below. Understand that the point of these pictures is to get your arms and chest connected. You should understand the feeling of “being connected” before you try to incorporate this critical step into your golf swing. If you hold the club straight out in front of you, there will be a triangle formed between your arms and chest. Just focus on keeping the triangle between your arms and chest fixed. Just move your arms with your chest. When your chest stops rotating, your arms also stop. Please see the three pictures below and try it out. Turn to your right, then back around to your left, keeping the triangle between your arms and chest constant at all times.

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