Villa Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Villa Golf Club

About Villa Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Villa Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Villa Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Villa Golf Club

Villa Golf is a family run, nine hole pay&play course, set in a tranquil valley in the charming, picturesque, village of Blackham. Originally designed in 1990, the course has matured to become a genuine test of skill for both experienced and novices golfers. Although only 9 hole, the course is a gradually being improved, and offers a variation on the back nine for those wishing to play 18 holes.

Villa Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

The Screen Door

For many years Harvey Penick one the game’s greatest teachers taught that the putter should swing open on the backswing and swing closed on the follow-through like a screen door as it moved around a player ‘s body (Figure 4.6.3). He believed that the natural stroke path should move to the inside on the backswing (around a motionless body) and back to the inside on the follow-through. He taught many golfers to become great players including my good friends Tom Kite and Ben Crenshaw and his screen-door concept has been the generally accepted way to putt throughout most of the 50 years I’ve been playing this game.

It was how I wanted to putt back when I thought I had a chance to have a playing career. However despite my tremendous admiration for Mr. Penick and his teaching accomplishments (which are legendary) and my own efforts to copy his opening and closing “screen-door” method my more recent research has proven that while this stroke can be effective the screen door is neither the best nor the simplest way to swing a putter.

Three Pendulums

In my first book on putting Putt Like the Pros which was published about 10 years ago I pointed out that a pure-in-line stroke path along the Aimline was the easiest most natural and best putter path to use (Figure 4.6.4). However it turns out that many golfers including some golf professionals never read or understood the concepts that determined this to be a natural motion and continue to believe and teach that the putter should swing around the body in the screen-door semicircular motion as shown in Figure 4.6.5. To understand why the in-line stroke motion is the simplest way to putt you must first understand the mechanics of the way pendulums swing. Three pendu

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 75 lums are illustrated in Figure 4.6.6. Each is swinging from a fixed point with pendulum A swinging vertically below its suspension point describing a back-andforth in-line path along a straight line. Pendulum B is swinging at a 20-degree angle to the vertical supported by a small force shown by arrow B and describing a curved path around the spot directly below its suspension point. Pendulum C is swinging at the opposite 20-degree angle supported by arrow C in a curved motion in the opposite direction around the spot below its suspension point.

Villa Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

But golfers hit their putts (Figure 5.3.1). And when a ball is hit the distance it rolls depends on how hard it is hit. The power of the putt depends on the energy or effort put into the stroke. And therein lies the problem: You can’t see or feel the power of a hit before it happens. No matter how much a golfer practices hitting putts the right distance and speed when he or she gets under pressure and tries to apply the same hit to the ball with adrenaline-filled muscles the results will be wrong. Once again as the muscles get stronger the same feel that produced good results in practice produces a more powerful hit under pressure.

Many low-handicap amateurs fall into this trap. They practice with the belief that the harder and longer they work the better they’ll putt under pressure. They believe that putting well under pressure involves courage strength of conviction or some other inner quality of the heart. I suppose these character traits are admirable but they have nothing to do with how far the ball rolls in good putting. If you insist on hitting your putts and controlling your putt distance with your muscles then the only way to practice feel and touch is under pressure. The good player can accomplish this by playing in tournaments in which he is likely to face many pressure putts. Do enough of that – and enough is a lot – and you begin preparing yourself for future pressure situations. Higher-handicap golfers have a slightly different problem. Because hitting

Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual 117 with the hands is the natural way to putt most golfers begin by doing just that. The results won’t be very good but because the golfer is still new to the game poor putting will seem acceptable. It’s later as these golfers improve their ball-striking and short games and work on bringing their handicaps down that their natural (hand-muscle-controlled) putting stroke limits their ability to score.

The Amateurs Proved It

Let me give you one more problem with “hitting” your putts: It’s an inaccurate way to control the power transmitted to the ball. We measured this (Figure 5.3.2) when we tested the putting strokes of some 150 amateurs at the DuPont World Amateur tournament by measuring the length of their strokes when they putted. The averaged results show (Figure 5.3.3) that the length of their backswings varied only about 6 inches while the length of the putts produced varied from 6 to 30 feet (on a flat putting surface of 9.0 green speed). This means their backswing the power generator of the pulling stroke varied only 6 inches for 24 feet or about one-quarter inch per foot.

Think of the pressure that puts on every pull. These amateurs must be able to sense and feel a difference of less than one inch – between a 9- and 9 3/4-inch backswing – to produce putts of 12 and 15 feet respectively. And that’s not all. They also have to accurately feel the differences in the strength of the hits that produce these two putts of different lengths. As these examples prove there is not much margin for error when you’re trying to control the distance your putts roll with a hit. There is a better way.

5.4 The Dead-Hands Stroke

Villa Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Villa Golf Club

After we get through the remaining sections, you will understand that this will change your swing plane a bit. Your swing plane will become more horizontal, the straighter you stand up. Please realize that nothing else should change. You will swing each of your clubs in exactly the same fashion (found below). This repositioning at setup will have a huge effect on the outcome of your shot, so please take some time to see where you are the most comfortable.

Villa Golf Club