Ulverston Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Ulverston Golf Club

About Ulverston Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Ulverston Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Ulverston Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Ulverston Golf Club

The Club, originally founded in 1895, is situated at the southern end of the Lake District overlooking Morecambe Bay. It has been at this location close to the quaint village of Bardsea alongside the coast road to Barrow-in-Furness since 1910.If you are looking for an excellent day’s golf in the Northwest of England try Ulverston Golf Club in Cumbria. The club is situated close to the Lake District overlooking Morecambe Bay and is just a short drive from the M6.

Ulverston Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

The Touch-Touch Drill Place the two pillows on the floor 12 inches apart and set your putter so it is addressing an imaginary ball between them. Place the metronome close by so you can hear it and adjust it conveniently. To start the test place your putter between the two pillows (Figure 11.3.2) and begin swinging it back and forth. Work the motion into a rhythm that touches one pillow at the top of the backswing on one

Establish Your Practice Framework 229 beat the other pillow at the end of the follow-through on the next heat. Continue swinging your putter back and through never stopping or changing rhythm and continue to touch each pillow on consecutive beats of the metronome.

This is the “touch-touch” drill performed at your preliminary putting rhythm. This likely isn’t quite your best rhythm so it must he refined until it fits you perfectly. Continue the drill “touch-touch ” back and forth now with your eyes closed. Concentrate on how much energy you’re using to execute this stroke at this rhythm.

Find Your Natural Rhythm

Stop and increase the cadence of the metronome five beats per minute (for example if your preliminary setting was 80 beats per minute set it to 85). Execute the touch-touch drill again at the faster heat with your eyes closed. Feel if this rhythm is easier or takes more energy than the first rhythm. (When you first run this drill it may take several minutes to get the feel of energy required to swing your putter at each rhythm. But you’ll quickly begin to recognize when a new rhythm takes more or less energy.)

If the higher cadence is easier then adjust your metronome five beats higher and try again. But if the new cadence was more difficult drop down by five beats per minute and it should feel easier. The goal is to find the precise cadence to within one beat per minute at which you swing your putter with the least amount of effort or energy. This is your natural body rhythm the cadence at which your body moves most efficiently (using the least amount of energy).

Ulverston Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

But there’s yet another problem with forearm rotation: it feels natural. Even Tour professionals don’t realize they’re doing it and when I tell them to stop they usually say “What do you mean I’m not rotating my arms! ” But of course they are. And like the pros most golfers don’ t mean to do it and if you ask them don’t think they are. But they are and you probably are too. Which is too bad because forearm rotation makes putting more difficult more inconsistent and less effective.

You’ll have to wait until Chapter 13 to learn how to stop rotating your forearms. For now however make a mental note that you will stop making this destructive motion. It will be one of your challenges in improving your putting and a crucial one.

Body Power

In the previous chapter I talked about body putting something rarely seen among the pros because it’s a bad thing to do. Your body is large and the big muscles of the chest back and legs are strong particularly when compared to the small amounts of power needed to roll a ball on the fast surface of a putting green. Still many golfers put too much of their body into the stroke rotating the lower body sliding the lower body toward the hole or moving the upper body away from the hole (Figure 4.5.2). All these motions are unintentional (at least I hope so) but they still produce unwanted power and directional instability.

For example I estimate that for every inch the body moves toward the target during the putting stroke the ball moves an additional foot on the green. And rotating the lower body not only adds power it also causes the putterface to rotate from open to closed.

Putting is a game in which delicate feel and touch create exactly the right speed and break of your putts. When you’re trying to be precise body power causes nothing but trouble.

School students turn (top) slide (middle) and reverse (bottom) their bodies during their putting stroke motions.

Ulverston Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Ulverston Golf Club

Hold the club steady with your right hand, and place left hand underneath the club as shown. The first joint of the left forefinger should be directly on the bottom of the handle, as well as the last joint of your left pinky. Once you have placed your palm on top of the club, do the same with your left thumb. Place it directly on top of the handle of the club. Next, interlock the left forefinger, and the right pinky. Nudge your right hand all the way towards the bottom of the grip. Now again, wrap the right palm all the way around the top of the grip. Don’t hold the grip of the club in your right palm. You should be able to cover up your left thumb with your right palm if you’ve done it correctly. You’ll see another V-shape being made where your right thumb and right forefinger meet. As a check, this V should be pointing directly at your right shoulder. If it doesn’t point at your right shoulder, rotate your hand on the grip so that it does. Your fingers should be giving the club most of the support it needs, NOT your palms.

Ulverston Golf Club