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Golf Lessons at Ufford Park Golf Club

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Golf Lessons at Ufford Park Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Ufford Park Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

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Best Western Ufford Park is the perfect location for a hotel break in East Anglia. Set in 120 acres of tranquil Suffolk Parkland, the hotel is one of the finest in the Ipswich area. With 87 ensuite bedrooms (from 2007 ALL bedrooms will be non smoking), numerous function rooms and luxurious leisure facilities, Best Western Ufford Park Hotel is the Ipswich area’s hotel of choice, whether it’s for an annual conference, a wedding or just a break away.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Practice the Way You Intend to Play

Always use your preputt routine your natural putting rhythm and your ritual during your practice sessions so you practice the way you want to make the most important putt of your life. Then when that crucial pressure-packed putt comes along your stroke can be controlled by your subconscious a natural reaction to your ritual a simple repetition of the preview stroke you’ve just seen and felt.

To make your rhythm routine and ritual a habit you need to have repeated them many times over and over the same way every time. And there’s no better time or place to make these repetitions than when you’re building and grooving your putting stroke mechanics. If you create your rhythm routine and ritual first then use them throughout all training and practice periods the powerful putting game you develop will be pressure-proof on the course.

Many golfers spend years developing their stroke mechanics only to putt miserably whenever they face pressure. This happens because pressure shuts down the conscious mind forcing the subconscious to revert to whatever feels natural. If you practice and build a putting game as I’ve described – starting with rhythm routine and ritual – the stroke that your subconscious reverts to under pressure will be your natural stroke the one you built your best stroke.

Now you’re ready to begin improving the more traditional parts of your putting game. But a last word about ritual and routine. Yours need to work for you and no one else. Don’t copy mine or think anyone else’s will work for you. Get on the practice putting green and think about what you’d like to do before facing the most important putts in your future. Without thinking about stroke mechanics find a rhythm routine and ritual that work for you. None of the Tour professionals I work with use my ritual or routine. That may be where they start but they modify them to fit their personalities and rhythms. You should – actually you must – do the same. The rest of your putting life depends on it.

11.5 Flow-Lines

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Croquet-Style

Next on the “easiness” scale (which means it’s a little more difficult than the techniques above) is standing so you face the putting line and putt croquet-style between your legs. Yes this really has been used. Bob Duden and Bob Shave Jr. two PGA Tour pros who had been struggling with their putting used this technique back in the 1960s. I’ve never been sure whether the USGA banned this method because it was too easy too nontraditional or it just looked bad when viewed from behind. It certainly made putting easier because it gave the golfer the best view of the line before the putt and a clear view of what the ball was doing immediately after it started to roll.

Both of these views provide critically important feedback that golfers generally miss when putting in the conventional style (that is standing to the side of the line). Croquet-style putting has other benefits: It removes all rotational motion of the forearms (which opens and closes the putterface during conventional putting) it forces the wrists to remain solid (no breakdown) and it creates the perfect in-line stroke path straight down the intended putting line.

Croquet putting is so easy that it was used by no less a legend than Sam Snead in the mid-1960s (when he was in his mid-fifties) to counter a case of the yips. Snead actually putted this way (Figure 3.3.1) – with one foot on either side of the target line – during the 1966 PGA Championship where he finished tied for sixth. Perhaps it was seeing the great Samuel Jackson Snead putt from the wrong direction or perhaps it was deemed to reduce the skill required to play the game – in any case croquet-style putting was quickly outlawed by golf’s powers that be.

So Sam modified the method slightly changing to “sidesaddle” (Figure 3.3.2)

Methods of Putting 39 doing everything as much as he could the same except bringing both feet to the same side of the target line. Snead continued to putt this way until the end of his competitive career and his creation is I believe the next-easiest way to putt.

Just as with croquet-style Sam found that putting sidesaddle allowed him to bend over slightly and look down the line of his putt. But more important it still did away with the breakdown of his wrists. I’m sure golf’s grand pooh-bahs didn’t like what they saw but either they couldn’t figure out a way to outlaw the sidesaddle technique without getting sued or maybe they didn’t have the heart to drive Sam out of the game. Thank heavens they didn’t because it was wonderful watching him play the game even putting from the side for all those years.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Ufford Park Golf Club

Focus on using your spine as your axis now. Turn both shoulders and sides directly around your spine. Keep your left arm locked, and your left wrist locked. Although difficult to see from this camera-angle, the triangle is still perfectly in tact.

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