Tynedale Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Tynedale Golf Club

About Tynedale Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Tynedale Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Tynedale Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Tynedale Golf Club

A warm welcome awaits you atTynedale Golf Club. A pleasant, picturesque 9 hole parkland golf course on the banks of the River Tyne, Suitable for all handicaps, this gently undulating, almost flat, tree lined course always proves a very good test for golfers, young and old.Par 69 gents, 71 ladies.Visitors very welcome 7 days a week

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Taking a Trip

Stick with me here as I equate the skills of putting touch feel and green-reading on the golf course to what you do when taking a Thanksgiving drive to your parents’ house. First to have a nice trip you need to know how many miles you have to drive and how much of the trip is mountain driving. With that knowledge you can figure out how much gas you need to make it there. This is like having touch in putting which is knowing how long the putt is so you can then figure out how much power will be required in your stroke to get the ball to the hole.

And you’d better know how much gas you need before starting the trip because there are no filling stations (putting stroke adjustments) along the way (after you hit the ball).

Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual 113

Once you know how much gas you need then you have to figure out how hard to step on the gas pedal and when to step on the brakes as you drive on your Thanksgiving trip (something you figure out after you are into the trip) to negotiate the stops and turns in the road along the way. This “knowing how to drive” is analogous to knowing how to feel the proper stroke in putting where you must know in your mind’s eye the required size of the swing (or hardness of the hit) as well as how it will look and feel to impart the power which will provide the proper energy and speed of roll required. So touch is knowing how long the trip is and how much power it will require and feel is knowing how to apply the power (how to drive) to get you there.

Of course good touch and feel also require a proper read of the green knowing what will happen to your putt as it rolls. Think of green-reading as having a good road map for your journey. A good map or good directions can make the trip easy but a bad map with poor directions can turn the simplest trip into a nightmare.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

So you need a map enough gas and the knowledge of how hard to step on the gas pedal along the way. You need all these things in concert to have a good trip. And you need good feel touch and green-reading skills also working together to putt well. Leave one out or do one poorly and it will he the same as losing your way on your Thanksgiving trip. Feel touch and green-reading are separate skills essentially different in nature yet each needs to be developed to provide the best result. And in case I ‘ve confused you that result is to roll the ball into the hole.

5.2 Touch and Feel Are in the Mind’s Eye

The skill bases for your touch and feel (green-reading will be discussed in Chapter 7) are intermingled in your mind. They are also intermingled in that they have a combined effect on putting results. But each is a separate skill which can be learned and developed over time.

Touch is in your head but it begins with knowing what your putt looks like and remembering (knowing based on past experience) how much power (the size or intensity of stroke) was required in the past for similar putts. Touch is an acquired skill based on past experiences. It resides in your memory bank and plays a part in creating the mind’s-eye picture of the size of stroke you need.

Before you can develop a good feel for a putt you need to have a good idea for how long it is and how much power will be required to roll it the proper speed and distance: In other words you need to have touch. Given that feel for the putt involves having a good idea of how to apply the power which will be needed to roll the ball at the optimum speed along that line to allow it to break into the hole. Having good feel for a putt is having the idea or picture in your mind’s eye of how the stroke will look and feel in both rhythm and intensity as it rolls the ball to the hole. So a part of feel is in your head. Feel also involves a kinesthetic awareness for the violence (or nonviolence) of your swing and knowing the physical sensation to expect at impact including the vibrations that will travel up the shaft after the putter strikes the ball. It is based on the feel of your collected experience from thousands of swings you’ve made on previous putts and the results they produced. This feel is produced in your nerve endings fingers arms and shoulders in the muscles of all of these entities as well as in your brain and memory.

Is one part of feel more important than any other? I don’t know. But more to the point I’m not sure I care. Because I do know that all these factors are necessary for good putting and the end result feel ultimately is experiential. You’ve got to do it lots of times to learn it and know it.

Feel is knowing how to do it touch is knowing what to do. A golfer with good touch can have a had day physically when his body simply can ‘t execute what his brain knows he should do. On a day like this we’d say his feel is off. This golfer will be frustrated because he doesn’t seem to be able to do what he knows he can and needs to do. Compare that to a golfer with poor touch: He can have great feel and still never make a putt because if you choose the wrong speed yet roll it perfectly at that speed the results still won ‘t be very good. So poor-touch golfers are more likely to get bewildered than frustrated (Figure 5.2.1).

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Tynedale Golf Club

Here is a view from the front. The goal of this photo is to show that there is no lateral movement. Simply rotating your right shoulder around your spine.*Please note that you should NOT be cocking your wrists at the end of your backswing. While this may add a bit of power, it will totally throw off your timing. The results of a wrist cock are slices, hooks, fat shots, etc.

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