Tredegar Rhymney Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Tredegar & Rhymney Golf Club

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Golf Lessons at Tredegar & Rhymney Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

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Tredegar & Rhymney Golf Club

The course is a most picturesque one, running in three terraces on the mountain between Tredegar and Rhymney, affording glorious views and the air is heavily laden with health giving ozone equal to the best spa in England and Wales.The greens and fairways have been excellently prepared by the club professional Mr Phillips and many experts in the game have complimented him upon his success. Describing the greens as among some of the best in the district.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Here’s a piece of advice to remember as you keep reading. When you’re looking at a putt which element do you consider first? Line or speed? Since line is the more instinctive it would make sense to choose line first and then determine the correct optimum Aimline and speed that produce the optimum ball track. speed for that line. That’s fine you certainly can do that. But if you do be aware that you have to perform both judgments – first line then speed and you cannot forget to determine the speed (which many golfers don ‘t even know how to do). Having figured your line you must turn your focus to the proper speed for that line. What if the line feels comfortable but the speed doesn’t? Or what if the speed feels good but you know it isn’t right for the line you’ve already picked? There are a lot of opportunities for subconscious conflict. There must be a better way.

Speed Is More Important Than Line 185

And there is. Rather than focusing on line or speed I’ve found that the best way is to imagine neither the Aimline nor the speed but the entire ball track you expect your putt to roll on. Because you can’t correctly imagine a ball track without your mind including both line and speed. That’s what the ball track is – the path of your rolling ball that results from the combination of line and speed that you give it (in a real putt or your imagination).

So just as in Chapter 7 where I encouraged you to look for ball tracks in your green-reading efforts ball tracks again are the answer this time to seeing speed. Because I assure you if you can imagine the ball track you want starting on the Aimline you have chosen your subconscious will include the speed.

8.3 Green Speed Affects Ball Tracks

The speed of the putting surface is something else to consider when seeing a ball track. Green speeds are measured every day around the world with the “Stimpmeter” (see section 4.3 for details). Most greens in the United States roll between 7.0 and 11.0 on the Stimpmeter meaning that balls released down this ramp (Figure 8.3.1) roll on average between 7 and 11 feet on the flat portions of these greens. This measurement is a simple way to approximate the frictional force the green ‘s surface exerts on rolling balls which is what primarily slows them and brings them to a stop.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 75 lums are illustrated in Figure 4.6.6. Each is swinging from a fixed point with pendulum A swinging vertically below its suspension point describing a back-andforth in-line path along a straight line. Pendulum B is swinging at a 20-degree angle to the vertical supported by a small force shown by arrow B and describing a curved path around the spot directly below its suspension point. Pendulum C is swinging at the opposite 20-degree angle supported by arrow C in a curved motion in the opposite direction around the spot below its suspension point.

All three pendulums are describing pure pendulum motions (the pendulum rhythm will be discussed in section 6.3) which occur in a gravitational field such as that found on Earth. But only pendulum A swings with gravity helping to determine its straight in-line path without any rotation or curvature of the swing path. As you can see both pendulums B and C require outside forces to keep them moving in circular motions.

Now relate these pendulums to putting strokes by attaching putters to the bottom of each pendulum. Pendulum B is what Harvey Penick prescribed: The golfer’s hands hang outside of his shoulder line (the suspension point) at some angle supported by the force B (shown by Justin Leonard in Figure 4.6.7). This puller will describe a curved path around the body like a screen door as long as no hand or arm muscles prevent it from doing so.

In Figure 4.6.8 Fuzzy Zoeller simulates pendulum C by holding his hands inside of his shoulders and at an angle to his suspension point. This putter clearly rotates from outside the Aimline going back to outside the Aimline on the follow-through (the opposite of the screen-door rotation of pendulum B). Again this is a natural pendulum motion but it requires a small force (C) to keep his hands and his I5-degree angle to the vertical below the suspension point.

In these two examples of pendulums B and C it is clear that small side forces are required to make these strokes acceptable for putting and both strokes involve curved paths rotating around the golfer’s body. Now look at pendulum A as a putting stroke which involves no side force or curving path.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 77

The Simplest Pendulum

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Tredegar & Rhymney Golf Club

The completed grip with both “V” shapes pointed toward the right shoulder. Note the “V” shapes are parallel with each other.Hopefully, you already have a grip that closely resembles this one. There are some slight variations, but this grip is standard for the most part. It should produce the best results. However, if you have a different grip than this, and you are more comfortable using it, you may continue using it. A grip is hard to change, and this one may feel really uncomfortable to you; however, benefits will come if you embrace this new grip. The “Simple Golf Swing” will most likely provide to you the desired results, even if you use your current grip. However, if you are still having problems when you get through the system, please incorporate the above grip method into your swing.

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