The Goodwood Club

Golf Lessons at The Goodwood Club

About The Goodwood Club

Golf Lessons at The Goodwood Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit The Goodwood Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

The Goodwood Club

Goodwood Golf CourseOn the evening of July 15th, 1892 six Sussex gentlemen came together to propose that a golf club should be formed for Chichester and the surrounding area. Despite the meeting’s low turnout, by the end of the evening, the new club had acquired 22 members – including three vicars and two unattached ladies! The nine hole course was formed at Peckham’s Copse, North Mundham and the entrance fee and annual subscription came to one guinea apiece.

The Goodwood Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

There is a best stance for you a best address position for you a best grip and a best stroke for you. Just as when you’re sick there are thousands of pills you could take. But you don’t take the one that just looks or tastes good. You take the one that makes you better. In putting the key is to find which options help you putt better then practice and groove them until you own them. Once grooved and working well they will begin to feel comfortable and become natural. Only then will they “feel right.”

There are occasions when golfers cause themselves problem on the greens as a result of not understanding some of nature’s “rules of the game.”

Here is a fact: Straight downhill putts are usually easier to make than straight uphill putts. This may be the opposite of what you think and have heard on television when announcers mention that “Joe Pro is happy to be below the hole facing an uphill putt.” But what they don’t say – perhaps because they’ve never studied it – is that on downhillers the force of gravity tends to hold putts on-line minimizing the error caused by a slightly open or closed clubface at impact. On the same length uphill putt however gravity maximizes the result of the same error actually increasing the possibility of missing the hole (Figure 2.6.1).

All that said it’s easier to three-putt a downhiller than an uphill putt of the same length. The reason is speed: Downhill putts require a more delicate touch to control rolling speed. If you stop and think about that (which I’ll bet you never have) it’s pretty obvious. But obvious isn’t factual and obvious doesn’t give you a sense of the severity of the problem. So look at Figure 2.6.2 which shows how far five balls on a flat green will roll when putted with perfect-length backswings made with a pendulum stroke to produce putts of 3 6 9 12 and 15 feet. Of course they roll 3 6 9 12 and 15 feet. Using my True Roller I can produce the same release energies for putts of 3 6 9 12 and 15 feet. In both series of putts the spread of distances between the shortest and longest ball is 12 feet (15 feet – 3 feet).

The True Roller

Years ago I created the True Roller a simple ramp device to control the direction and speed of simulated putts (a 1978 photo is shown below). It turns out to be one of the most useful devices I’ve come up with for rolling balls and testing on the greens.

The Goodwood Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Aimline then he is sure to misalign his putter (and likely miss the putt) because now his view has changed to alignment angle B. The mind can ‘t keep everything properly aimed if it has to deal with constantly changing views of alignment.

Any golfer whose eyes are not consistently vertically above his Aimline will have to change his view of alignment due to the changing angles he sees for putts of different lengths. The result is inconsistent alignment. The only way to align the putterface properly time after time is by positioning both eyes exactly vertically above the Aimline so the alignment angle is always zero degrees for all putts re gardless of length (Figure 4.4.3 C and D).

Detailed procedures for learning how to aim properly will be discussed in sec tion 12.6 where I’ll show you how to improve and even perfect your ability to aim. But for now realize that aim is an essential fundamental of putting a learned skill you have probably learned incorrectly (without knowing it) based on the results of past putting strokes and the positioning of your eyes (which you should keep vertically above the Aimline Figure 4.4.4).

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 67

If you don ‘t learn to aim correctly then no one (myself and my Scoring Game Schools included) will ever be able to teach you a good putting stroke. A good putting stroke with bad aim will miss every time and your subconscious will never let you learn a stroke that it knows will miss every time. Instead you ‘ll begin compensating. However once you learn to aim accurately along the Aimline you choose your putting instincts will lead you to make better less compensating strokes and that leads to holing more putts.

4.5 Power Source

Your power source is the part of your body that supplies the power to control and move the putter through the impact zone of your stroke. The muscles you use to control your putter determine your putting power source. The three most common power sources used in putting are: (1) the small muscles of the fingers hands wrists and forearms; (2) the arms and shoulders; and (3) body motion.

The Goodwood Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition The Goodwood Club

The chest and shoulders shouldn’t be turning, unless your arms are turning with them. In other words, you want to start your swing with a shoulder turn, but your arms should start swinging at EXACTLY the same time. They are an extension. They are connected. Furthermore, your arms shouldn’t be swinging unless your chest is rotating. Don’t start swinging your arms without starting the shoulder turn. They are connected. Your left elbow remains locked throughout the entire swing. When you complete your shoulder turn, your arms should stop as well. The goal will be to have your left arm exactly parallel to the ground. Your elbow is still locked. When it gets there…STOP. Do not continue to swing your arms.

The Goodwood Club