The Craythorne Golf Club

Golf Lessons at The Craythorne Golf Club

About The Craythorne Golf Club

Golf Lessons at The Craythorne Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit The Craythorne Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

The Craythorne Golf Club

What The Craythorne provides is a challenging parkland course which is easy walking with a selection of tight. Originally the design was a 9 hole layout which was re-routed in 1983 to become 18 holes. Not a great deal of investment was given to the course in its first 20 years and it wasn’t until the present owner, Tony Wright, took over that major changes were made. Over 5000 trees, 75,000 tonnes of soil, irrigation system, two ponds, 14 new tees and 5 new greens have been introduced in the past 10 years.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Head Motion

Your head should not move during your putting stroke. If it does particularly if it moves in the opposite direction that your putter moves work on the “hair drill.”

Stand facing a wall with the toe of your putter about half an inch from the baseboard and your hair just touching the wall (but don’t rest your head against the wall). Execute your ritual and a putting stroke hitting a ball if you like but it’s not necessary. If your head moves during the stroke you’ll feel your hair brushing the wall (Figure 12.5.1). Spend a few minutes a day for several weeks putting this way and you’ll learn the feeling of not moving your head during the stroke. (If you don’t have enough hair to provide good feedback wear a soft hat.)

You also can get head-motion feedback outdoors by making putting strokes while watching your shadow. Find a reference object that won’t move (like the hole in Figure 12.5.2) and stand so your shadow falls next to it. Then you’ll be able to see any head movement during your stroke.

If you feel your hair brushing against the wall you know your head moved.

Body Motion

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Finally having seen how this putter swings with both shafts now look what happens when the vertical part of the shaft is removed in Figure 4.6.9A”. By removing the original vertical shaft (which hung under the hands) and the back of the putterface we have turned this into a normal-looking putter which still swings in a pure-in-line path as before. This face (again assuming the putter was balanced perfectly) will not rotate open or closed and will not swing or curve around the body. The natural swinging motion of this putter will be purely in-line along a line exactly parallel to his shoulder line. In other words this putter path will track right down the Aimline the intended line of the putt.

4.7 A Pure-In-Line Stroke Keeps the Putterface Square

Section 4.6 should prove to you that a pure simple pendulum can swing in three different motions all of which can relate to a putting stroke. The pendulum of a putting stroke (assuming the golfer has a pendulum and doesn ‘t hit with his hands or wrists or move his body) is the pendulum formed between his suspension point (between his shoulders) and his hands (Figure 4.7.1). And it is this position of a golfer’s hands the angle of his pendulum relative to vertical that determines not only the natural swing path of his putterhead but also the behavior of the putterface angle relative to the Aimline. (Note: your elbows and forearms don’t have to be under your shoulders just your hands.)

As shown on the bottom in Figure 4.7.2 when the golfer’s hands (pendulum

(A) = no rotation; Inclined (B) and (C) = screen-door rotations.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 79 balls in illustration) are outside his shoulders the screen-door stroke produces both a curved path around the golfer’s body and significant putterface angle rotation relative to the Aimline. This is where the in-line stroke shines as shown in the top figure: When the golfer’s hands (pendulum balls) are vertically under his shoulders his stroke path is not only naturally in-line with his Aimline his putter-face also stays square to the Aimline at all times. As you will see in section 4.8 this is an incredible advantage because the face angle is very influential in determining what line the ball starts rolling on in putting.

80 The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition The Craythorne Golf Club

First of all, it’s important that you realize that your grip will affect the results that you get. However, it’s not as complicated as the other systems make it out to be. First, grab the club with your right hand so the face of it is toward the target. Keep the face pointed toward the target, while placing your left hand on the bottom of the grip or handle. At this point you should be holding your left hand out flat, so that it is touching the bottom of the grip. Position the joint where your left pinky meets your palm directly underneath the handle of the club. Keep the pinky there and place the first joint in your left forefinger directly underneath the club. Now, do not lift your fingers up, bringing the grip of the club into your palm; instead, hold the handle steady with your left fingers and wrap your palm around the top of the grip. This is an important distinction. Again, don’t wrap the fingers towards the palm, but instead wrap your palm around the top of the club. Now, you should be able to easily place your left thumb directly on top of the club. This should form a V-shape where your left thumb and left forefinger meet. This V-shape should point directly to your right shoulder when it’s complete.

The Craythorne Golf Club