Sutton Coldfield Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Sutton Coldfield Golf Club

About Sutton Coldfield Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Sutton Coldfield Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Sutton Coldfield Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Sutton Coldfield Golf Club

Sutton Coldfield Golf Club is one of the most prestigious private members clubs in the Midlands. It was founded in 1889 and two years later moved to the present course in Sutton Park. Sutton Park itself was once part of a royal hunting chase and was given to the people of Sutton Coldfield by Bishop Vesey in the 16th century.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Golfers simply don’t know how to think about speed. They assume their ball track (or line or direction whatever you call it) is independent of speed. Nothing could be further from the truth! In fact – and this is something you must never forget – everything about your ball tracks (their shape size and direction) is a function of the speed. You can start with the same Aimline but produce very different roll distances ball tracks and results simply by changing speeds.

Look at the three ball tracks in Figure 8.1.2. These are three different putts each started on the same optimum Aimline to roll into the center of the hole. However each putt was started at the wrong speed for that Aimline so the balls rolled through the break on the high side lipped out on the low side and missed significantly low. On the course these misses probably would have been blamed on misreading the break pulling it just a little and hitting the putt poorly (giving it a weak roll) respectively. The truth of the matter is that there was no misread no pull and no mis-hit. All three misses were simply the result of rolling the ball the wrong speed.

Blaming the wrong factor has two had results. First it encourages golfers to

Speed Is More Important Than Line 181 work on the wrong parts of their game usually playing with their stroke path grip follow-through or something else that’s easy to see. Second they never work on the real problem which is learning to control speed.

It’s true: Speed itself can be hard to see. And the results of bad speed are difficult to diagnose and often go misdiagnosed. Let me show you just how big a problem this is. In testing that provided amateur golfers with the perfect aim direction on 12-foot putts that broke 4 inches we determined that 80 percent of all those that missed were due to improper speed (their line was good enough to go in with good speed). The other 20 percent of the misses were due to pushing or pulling putts far enough off-line to miss. Based on this data we teach that speed is four times more important than line. But what do golfers work on? Our research goes on to show that most golfers spend more than 90 percent of their putting practice time working on controlling their line.

8.2 Line Is Instinctive

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

And you’d better know how much gas you need before starting the trip because there are no filling stations (putting stroke adjustments) along the way (after you hit the ball).

Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual 113

Once you know how much gas you need then you have to figure out how hard to step on the gas pedal and when to step on the brakes as you drive on your Thanksgiving trip (something you figure out after you are into the trip) to negotiate the stops and turns in the road along the way. This “knowing how to drive” is analogous to knowing how to feel the proper stroke in putting where you must know in your mind’s eye the required size of the swing (or hardness of the hit) as well as how it will look and feel to impart the power which will provide the proper energy and speed of roll required. So touch is knowing how long the trip is and how much power it will require and feel is knowing how to apply the power (how to drive) to get you there.

Of course good touch and feel also require a proper read of the green knowing what will happen to your putt as it rolls. Think of green-reading as having a good road map for your journey. A good map or good directions can make the trip easy but a bad map with poor directions can turn the simplest trip into a nightmare.

So you need a map enough gas and the knowledge of how hard to step on the gas pedal along the way. You need all these things in concert to have a good trip. And you need good feel touch and green-reading skills also working together to putt well. Leave one out or do one poorly and it will he the same as losing your way on your Thanksgiving trip. Feel touch and green-reading are separate skills essentially different in nature yet each needs to be developed to provide the best result. And in case I ‘ve confused you that result is to roll the ball into the hole.

5.2 Touch and Feel Are in the Mind’s Eye

The skill bases for your touch and feel (green-reading will be discussed in Chapter 7) are intermingled in your mind. They are also intermingled in that they have a combined effect on putting results. But each is a separate skill which can be learned and developed over time.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

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The completed grip with both “V” shapes pointed toward the right shoulder. Note the “V” shapes are parallel with each other.Hopefully, you already have a grip that closely resembles this one. There are some slight variations, but this grip is standard for the most part. It should produce the best results. However, if you have a different grip than this, and you are more comfortable using it, you may continue using it. A grip is hard to change, and this one may feel really uncomfortable to you; however, benefits will come if you embrace this new grip. The “Simple Golf Swing” will most likely provide to you the desired results, even if you use your current grip. However, if you are still having problems when you get through the system, please incorporate the above grip method into your swing.

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