Stoneleigh Deer Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Stoneleigh Deer Park Golf Club

About Stoneleigh Deer Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Stoneleigh Deer Park Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Stoneleigh Deer Park Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Stoneleigh Deer Park Golf Club

The course is set in parkland, with trees of more than 250 years old. Our excellent cuisine is renowned in the area and the clubhouse atmosphere, envied by other clubs, helps makes Stoneleigh a unique venue for your golf day.

Stoneleigh Deer Park Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Putter Straws

You can further work on face-angle improvement outdoors this time on the practice putting green with Putter Straws. It ‘s a good idea to intersperse this outdoor Putter Straws with Elevated Aimline practice with your indoor Putter Rail practice sessions.

Putter Straws are a feedback mechanism we developed to convince golfers of the relationship between their putterface angle and their hands and forearms. With one straw on the back of my left hand and two straws on my putterface it’s easy to see this relationship when I look down and rotate my left forearm (Figure 12.4.4). Unless you let go of the grip there will always be a consistent relationship between your left hand and forearm and your putterface. But golfers don’t really understand and internalize this relationship until we make them look at what happens to the straws during a real stroke.

Watch my stroke (both the putterface and back-left-hand straws) on a straight-in six-foot putt (Figure 12.4.5). In my pure-in-line-square stroke my putterface stays square to the Aimline because my forearms never rotate around my body. Most golfers understand this after they see it but they’ve never understood before

Improve Your Stroke Mechanics 289 why their putterfaces turned left after impact in their own strokes. The following drill helps them to both see and feel it:

Straight Putts First

Stoneleigh Deer Park Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Something else to watch out for in your putting stroke motion is any change in your elbow angles. I am told that early in the career of Arnold Palmer his father

Deacon told him the secret to putting was to keep his putter low going back and low coming through. However the only way you can keep the club low to the ground is to extend and contract your elbows: Extend them during your back- swing contract them as you swing through impact then extend them again on your follow-through. I believe this complex set of motions – plus a propensity to power his putts with a wrist hinge – is what destroyed Arnold’s putting in the latter portion of his career.

I don’t mean to criticize Arnold or Deacon Palmer because Arnold putted well enough to be one of the best players of all time. But I’m convinced that with his fantastic imagination talent and competitive instincts (he certainly never had the best golf swing) he would have been even more dominant and for a longer time if he had used a simpler putting stroke and been a better putter.

The Grip: Light Is Better Than Tight

There are any number of ways to hold a putter. But I think there is only one way to set grip pressure and that is light and unchanging throughout your stroke. Light pressure is better than tight because squeezing your hands and flexing the hand wrist and arm muscles makes them stronger less pliant and less sensitive to delicate feelings. And remember your hands should be dead rather than strong when putting. So the lighter your grip (as long as the putter doesn’t slip out of your hands and your wrists don’t get floppy) the less likely you are to “hit” your putts and the more likely you will “stroke” them. This applies to all putting grips.

The purpose of your grip is to hold on to your putter as you allow it to move along the perfect in-line path with a square face angle through impact. There is no

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 105 right or wrong way to hold a putter for all golfers. But there is a best way for each golfer to hold his or her putter. This best way will lead to making the best stroke the greatest percentage of the time.

Stoneleigh Deer Park Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Stoneleigh Deer Park Golf Club

Keep focusing on bringing your right shoulder back and around your spine. Some of you may be able to turn about 90 degrees around your spine as shown in the picture on the left. Others may only be able to turn 45 degrees around your spine. Either is okay, but do not start moving other parts of the body to compensate for not being able to make a full shoulder turn. Stop when it gets uncomfortable. The important part is to STAY CONNECTED. When your left arm becomes parallel to the ground, stop your swing.

Stoneleigh Deer Park Golf Club