St Augustines Golf Club

Golf Lessons at St Augustines Golf Club

About St Augustines Golf Club

Golf Lessons at St Augustines Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit St Augustines Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

St Augustines Golf Club

St. Augustine’s Golf Club is a private members club that prides itself on having the reputation of being a very warm and welcoming club to both guests and visitors alike. Situated in the Pegwell Bay area of The Isle of Thanet the Club was established in 1908. St. Augustine’s Golf Links was originally designed by Tom Vardon with some holes adjacent to the sea shore. Unfortunately these holes were prone to flooding and after this land was requisitioned for logistical purposes during the 1st World War the course was reduced in size and redesigned to fit into the remaining land. Today this has resulted in a compact but very popular Golf Course that is well maintained and highly manicured.The Golf Course is reasonably flat with tight challenging holes and having six par three’s requires a degree of accuracy to score well. Par for the course is 69 and the standard scratch score is 66 from the white tees and 65 from the yellow tees with an overall length of 5,254 yards.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Look at my two putting strokes in Figure 6.4.1. If you imagine the actual motion of these strokes can’t you just see each stroke rolling the ball distinctly different distances? I assure you both strokes took exactly the same amount of time. That time is based on my rhythm and if you measured it – from the top of my backswing to the end of my follow-through – you would find it swings at a

Stability and Rhythm: Two Artistic Fundamentals 137 cadence of 80 beats per minute or three-quarters of a second per through-stroke.

The results of this system – vertical-pendulum stroke mechanics swinging in a pendulum rhythm – are staggering in the simplicity they bring to putting. They reduce the complexity of calculations to judge the feel and touch for distance and completely eliminate the need to guess how hard or fast a stroke is necessary to roll your putt the perfect speed. They eliminate the forces required to keep the putter blade square to the Aimline. And perhaps best of all they eliminate the need for golfers to think about their strokes about what they should and shouldn’t be doing. Learning the mechanics of a vertical-pendulum motion then learning to use that motion at a rhythm compatible with your body eliminates most of the variables that screw up most golfers’ strokes.

Before finding your rhythm a proviso. Having that rhythm won ‘t do you much good if you don’t first develop a putting ritual (see section 5.10) because the two must work together: The ritual is performed at the cadence of your body rhythm so the ritual is a warm-up for the stroke rhythm. Your ritual is put to a count (based on the rhythm) and practiced often enough that you can perform it even when the pressure is on. So if you can remember how to count you can putt no matter what the circumstances.

6.5 Find Your Body Rhythm

The rhythm of your putting stroke should be compatible with who you are: your size and weight your personality your metabolism and the rhythm that already governs actions like the way you walk and talk. (Rhythm is easier to see than read about so if you have difficulty visualizing what I’m saying in this section I recommend you watch a videotape I made called “Developing Great Touch” to understand what rhythm is and how it influences putting.)

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

All that said it’s easier to three-putt a downhiller than an uphill putt of the same length. The reason is speed: Downhill putts require a more delicate touch to control rolling speed. If you stop and think about that (which I’ll bet you never have) it’s pretty obvious. But obvious isn’t factual and obvious doesn’t give you a sense of the severity of the problem. So look at Figure 2.6.2 which shows how far five balls on a flat green will roll when putted with perfect-length backswings made with a pendulum stroke to produce putts of 3 6 9 12 and 15 feet. Of course they roll 3 6 9 12 and 15 feet. Using my True Roller I can produce the same release energies for putts of 3 6 9 12 and 15 feet. In both series of putts the spread of distances between the shortest and longest ball is 12 feet (15 feet – 3 feet).

The True Roller

Years ago I created the True Roller a simple ramp device to control the direction and speed of simulated putts (a 1978 photo is shown below). It turns out to be one of the most useful devices I’ve come up with for rolling balls and testing on the greens.

The first True Roller was eight feet long and very cumbersome but later versions have included laser-aiming attachments refined ball-release mechanisms and a level to ensure that the release ramp is always perfectly vertical and releasing balls in a straight line (Figure 2.6.4). The original intent of the True Roller was to simulate putts near the end of their rolls because the initial release of a ball differed from the initial roll of the putted balls (putts start out slightly lofted and sliding along the grass whereas the ball is already rolling as it leaves the True Roller). However after we tested and calibrated the True Roller to simulate putts we found no essential differences in putting results between balls putted versus those released from the True Roller.

You will see many balls and test results from balls rolled from the True Roller in this book. Remember that the True Roller is simply starting each ball in a given direction at the given speed. And that is what putting is all about.

Look next at the top of Figure 2.6.5 which shows how far the same five balls will roll on an uphill putt (released from the True Roller each with the same energy as before). The uphill putts stop closer together (the distance between the longest and shortest balls is 7.5 feet) indicating that on uphill putts balls tend to roll closer to the same distance. This means the roll of an uphill putt is less sensitive to the length of the stroke than putts on a level surface. The lesson is that even if you don’t hit all of your uphill putts the right speed be sure to get them past the hole.

Problems on the Greens 25

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition St Augustines Golf Club

Imagine the line that has been drawn is your spine (axis). When the backswing is made, just rotate everything around that axis. If you do this properly, you will be on the correct plane. This correct swing plane will help your power, accuracy, and consistency. Keep the left arm locked as shown.

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