South Leeds Golf Club

Golf Lessons at South Leeds Golf Club

About South Leeds Golf Club

Golf Lessons at South Leeds Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit South Leeds Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

South Leeds Golf Club

The founding fathers of our Golf Club at its Rothwell Haigh location were Mr Harry Howell Mr Frederick J Brown and Mr J Pratt. All three were businessmen of some substance and local standing. The three friends wished to play their golf at a location nearer to their places of work on the south side of the city. At that time South Leeds was the industrial heartland of the city and no such facility existed or had even been considered.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Improve Your Stroke Mechanics 273 day if you want until 80 percent of your strokes are quiet. Then it’s time to tighten the tolerance to the half-noise half-quiet level again.

Before you start each Putting Track session set your metronome to your body-rhythm tempo and prepare yourself to optimize your address posture and flowline positions as best you can. Assume your practice swing stance just outside the track (like your practice stance four inches left of your real putts on the green) and make a preview stroke of the putt you are going to practice. Then move into your setup in the track (use tape to mark your perfect toe-to-ball distance) and execute your ritual before every putt. If you do all this you’re not only improving your stroke path you’re committing your setup ritual and rhythm as well as your stroke path to subconscious control (and habit) at the same time.

Don’t be surprised if your first few practice sessions seem both physically and mentally taxing. You ‘ve probably never received so much feedback on your stroke before and your subconscious may not be accustomed to working this hard. But this is exactly what you want so keep it up. After a few sessions you’ll begin to feel relaxed and see real improvement. That’s when you’re ready to add a few more feedback devices to the mix.

By adding Elk’s Key (it should fit under the track without any adjustment) you optimize your shoulder flow-line learning (Figure 12.1.5). This is also a good time to start holding your follow-through position at the end of each stroke for five seconds (this habit will pay big benefits in later outdoor practice sessions).

The final addition to your Putting Track practice sessions is to work on making a pure-in-line-square down-the-Aimline stroke on breaking putts. Don’t do this right

274 Improve Your Stroke Mechanics away but after several sessions of good stroke-path results in the track and when it’s easy to hold your follow-through on-line for five seconds make one small change. After aiming the track at your target can put a small but visible piece of tape (any color as long as you can see it) directly behind the can then move the can six inches to the left. Now imagine you’re looking at a putt with six inches of break which requires seeing an Aimline that starts six inches outside the right edge of the cup. Don’t change anything but the location of the hole in your mind’s eye. Make your last look down the Aimline (at the tape not the can) then execute a perfect in-track stroke and hold your follow-through on the Aimline (between the rails without touching them). This is how you begin acclimating your stroke path to the Aimline for breaking putts. In the following session move the can a few inches to the right of the tape and practice a stroke for a left-to-right break of at least several inches. Go back to straight-down-the-line practice for straight putts in every third session.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Every part of Lee’s game is built on aiming to the left then blocking his swing through impact so it’s little surprise he does this when putting too. In my opinion Trevino is another great player who achieved greatness in spite of his putting not because of it. And he agrees: Lee told me that if he had putted as well as Jack Nicklaus you might never have heard of the Golden Bear.

I believe him. He has always been a great ball-striker (the best I ever measured) and he putted reasonably well but never great. He is a very talented player who did well with a somewhat complex putting stroke. But he would have putted better and won more with a better (which to me means simpler) putting stroke.

Next on my list of strokes (still moving toward simplicity) is the “blend” stroke a combination of the power stroke and a pure pendulum stroke usually employing a slight wrist hinge. A number of fine players putt this way including Brad Faxon Lee Janzen D. A. Weibring and Ben Crenshaw (Figure 3.5.9). Every one of these players is a wonderful putter and every one uses a predominantly pendulum motion with just a little bit of power provided by the hand muscles.

The small amount of wrist hinge each employs is done down the line so it doesn’t cause directional difficulty. When I’ve asked them about this motion they all say that their best putting days come when the stroke is more pendulum and less wrist. More proof that simplicity is the key ingredient in good putting.

The “right-hand push ” or “push stroke ” used by Jack Nicklaus has been a repeatable reliable performer for a long time. A friend once told me that Jack really wasn’t that good a player: He was just on a 30-year hot streak! Indeed Jack has putted consistently well throughout most of his career. Even today Jack’s putting remains unshakable perhaps the strongest part of his game.

Look at Figure 3.5.10 and you can see his right arm and hand arc behind the left pushing the putter through impact like a piston firing straight down the line. There is no putter rotation no forearm rotation and no wrist breakdown through the impact zone. The push stroke at its best and Jack at his best are and were almost unbeatable.

Methods of Putting 49

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition South Leeds Golf Club

Here is a picture at full speed. The wrists have completed their roll through the ball. The left elbow is close to the body, and about ready to break, allowing for follow through.Now, I’ll take you into the follow-through. This will be simple. Basically just keep turning around your spine. If you have flipped your wrists correctly, you won’t have to bother too much with the follow through. However, there is a basic position that you should be in when you finish the swing. You should be facing the target, and your right and left forearms should be crossed. Your right forearm should be closest to you, and the club should be out towards left field.

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