Sickleholme Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Sickleholme Golf Club

About Sickleholme Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Sickleholme Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Sickleholme Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Sickleholme Golf Club

Founded in 1898 Sickleholme is a small friendly club nestling in the heart of the beautiful Peak District of Derbyshire, some 13 miles from Sheffield, 16 miles from Chesterfield and 15 miles from Glossop. With an undulating parkland course of 6,064(Ladies 5.399 yards) and stunning views, it is hard to find a more spectacular or enjoyable venue anywhere.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

“Sure ” you say “it’s simple if you can roll your putts within three feet of the cup but that’s what I can’t do!” If that’s what you’re thinking it’s time you change the way you look at long (lag) putts. Look at me in Figure 13.3.11 holding the flagstick in a six-foot-diameter hole. I’m sure you’d bet that you could make every putt on every green if the holes were that big. When you see a real hole this big it looks enormous!

But avoiding three-putting is as simple as putting into a six-foot hole. So if it ‘s so simple why do you still three-putt? Not because it’s so difficult but because

3Z4 Develop Your Artistic Senses (Feel Touch Green-Reading) you don’t properly practice lag putting enough and you don’t have good feel or touch for your long putts.

To get the feel for lagging long putts close try our “Lag-Putt Drill ” which establishes three reference-distance putts – 40 50 and 60 feet – that you practice again and again. Every time you do this drill putt from different angles and slopes but always from 40 50 and 60 feet to a hole. You’ll find that once you begin to build confidence from these three distances (this will likely take repeating the drill on 10 different occasions) other long distances will become easier too.

Start by walking off your three distances and marking them with tees. putt three balls from 40 feet followed by three from 60 and three from 50. Do this cycle twice more then end with three putts from 50 feet that stop within your huge six-foot imaginary hole around the real hole (which means all three remaining putts are shorter than three feet). You haven’t completed the drill until you get the last three in a row to finish in the six-foot circle.

As you continue to practice this drill those last three good lags will become easier and easier and you’ll come to be dissatisfied on the course with lag putts that leave you second putts longer than three or four feet.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The Stimpmeter developed years ago by a man named Edward Stimpson is a crude yet simple way to measure how far a ball will roll on a flat portion of a green when it is given a standard starting speed. The USGA-approved version of a

Stimpmeter is a solid straight piece of aluminum extruded at a 30-degree angle with an indentation near the top and a beveled bottom (Figure 4.3.2). The beveled bottom allows the Stimpmeter to sit low to the green surface and reduce the bounce of a ball rolling down the channel when it hits the green.

The Stimpmeter was designed to release balls onto a green surface with constant initial speed (energy).

Measuring Green Speed To use a Stimpmeter a ball is placed in the indentation and the device is raised slowly until the ball rolls free and down the groove onto the green (Figure 4.3.3). Care must he taken to hold the Stimpmeter still as the ball rolls down the ramp to ensure constant release energy and ball speed at the bottom of the ramp.

To measure green speed three balls are rolled in one direction on the green measuring how far each ball rolls (in feet) from the end of the Stimpmeter. The same three balls then are rolled in the opposite direction over the same section of the green and again the distances are measured. The six distances are averaged to produce a quantitative measurement of the average distance a ball rolls on that green called the green speed. A slow green is about a 7 (meaning the balls rolled an average of 7 feet) while a fast green comes in at about a 10. Most PGA tournaments aim for green speeds between 10.5 and 11. When greens start rolling at 12 to 13 they are called “Augusta fast ” because that’s often the speed of the greens at Augusta National Golf Club home of The Masters every spring.

Longer rolls (from higher green speeds) for longer times mean the friction of

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 63 the green surface is low letting balls roll farther and longer. A rapidly slowing and short roll off a Stimpmeter means the friction of the green surface is high and the green speed is very slow.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Sickleholme Golf Club

Wrap your right fingers lightly around the handle of the club Alternative to the interlock grip (The overlap grip)

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