Shrivenham Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Shrivenham Park Golf Club

About Shrivenham Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Shrivenham Park Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Shrivenham Park Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Shrivenham Park Golf Club

There has been a golf course on the present site since 1966, with the full 18 holes being completed in 1969. In May of that year the course was officially opened by former Open champion, Max Faulkner and Ryder Cup star, Brian Barnes (see thumbnails below). Now a mature course set in 110 acres, Shrivenham Park has developed a deserved reputation as offering a good and interesting test for golfers of all abilities. Most memorable is the course’s own version of ‘Amen Corner’ – holes 5, 6 and 7 – which is always a talking point amongst visitors and members alike.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Experience is required both to learn good feel and touch and the confidence to fully use it. You cannot learn confidence from a book or videotape although both can teach you how to learn it. Once you learn the size of the stroke that you need and how it feels to make it then all it takes is practice to learn to move from the preview stroke to the real stroke in a timely manner. If you have learned to do this and practiced it a lot you’ll develop a quiet understanding a confidence a calm and a focus that allow you to concentrate on the meaningful and controllable aspects of feel and touch.

And your mind is important because it controls all of the above. It controls how you move your body and how you move your body controls your putter and how your putts start rolling. Your mind orchestrates the symphony – the motions the rhythm and the sequence of those motions – it controls the complete motion of the putting stroke. If you use positive self talk – something like “Okay now let’s make this the most beautiful rhythmic and smooth stroke we’ve ever seen” – before you prepare to putt and then maintain the presence of mind to prepare properly (making and judging a proper practice stroke then focusing on repeating it) your mind will allow you to execute the best stroke you know how to make. This is how a confident (positive) attitude helps a golfer putt better.

Some golfers even learn to create positive focus by using a negative image. A few of the professionals I’ve worked with stand over an important putt and imagine that they’ve already missed it. This is their way of creating a positive attitude because they know that they almost always make their putts on the second try.

The point is not how you create a good attitude. Rather it is that you do create an attitude before you putt that allows you to use a clear mind to see and feel the perfect stroke before you try to make it and also allows your body to go ahead and execute it without self-doubt.

Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual 127

5.8 The Preview Stroke

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Eye Position

Once your posture is correct as described above position your eyes somewhere directly over the Aimline of your putt as discussed in section 4.4. Accomplish this by moving closer to or farther away from the ball – not by changing your back angle or leaning over or hack. Remember the Aimline extends behind the hall so it’s okay to set your eyes slightly behind the ball Jack Nicklaus – style (Figure 4.10.6).

One word of realism here: Positioning your eyes over your Aimline won’t make you aim perfectly but it will allow you to aim consistently. If you learn how to aim perfectly (in Chapter 11) by eliminating compensations for your stroke faults then consistently perfect aim will become automatic.

Don ‘t Fight Your Flow-Lines

The easiest way to putt is with the “flow-lines” of your body aligned parallel-left of your Aimline (any line which is parallel to your Aimline and to the left of it is defined as “parallel-left of the Aimline). You’re probably not familiar with the term “flow-lines ” so look at Figure 4.10.7. The lines of flow through my shoulders forearms hips knees and feet are all parallel and to the left of my Aimline which is shown by the shaded white line on the green.

As I mentioned earlier (section 4.7) your putter will tend to swing naturally down the Aimline through impact if your shoulders are aligned parallel to that direction unless you do something to prevent this move with the muscles of your hands and wrists. So it’s very important to start your setup with the flow-line of your shoulders parallel to your Aimline.

To emphasize the power of this concept my “bad-flow-line” setup is shown in Figure 4.10.8. Look at my shoulder flow-line. From this position do you expect my putter to naturally swing (flow) down the Aimline? No way! It doesn’t do it when Perfy sets up and swings this way and it won’t swing down my Aimline either unless 1 compensate and use my muscles to make it do so.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Shrivenham Park Golf Club

This is the final setup position. The back is still straight. All you need to do is bend at the waist until the club touches the ground. As you can see, the arms are still stretched out, and the hands are hanging straight down from the shoulders. They seem lower than waist-level, but the relationship between the arms and chest has not changed. Your legs remain in a fixed position, while you move the arms and chest together to the ball. This is the key to a good, simple setup.

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