Sandford Springs Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Sandford Springs Golf Club

About Sandford Springs Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Sandford Springs Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Sandford Springs Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Sandford Springs Golf Club

Set amongst the rolling hills of Berkshire and Hampshire, Sandford Springs boasts a trio of challenging nine hole courses, a welcoming clubhouse with extensive facilities, a Sandford Springs Golf Academy and a well-stocked golf shop with custom fitting services.Sandford Springs makes best use of its enviable geography to present three challenging and distinctly different nine-hole loop courses – The Park, The Wood and The Lakes.The course was designed by Hawtree & Son, founder members of the British Institute of Golf Course Architects, ensuring the quality clearly apparent today. The first eighteen holes were officially opened by Nick Faldo MBE and Bernard Gallacher OBE on 6 June 1989, a date celebrated annually at the Summer Ball. The final nine holes were added in the summer of 1991.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

And those arc the same reasons I strongly discourage a narrow stance for putting. A narrow stance makes it too easy for the golfer to move and rotate the lower body. Furthermore a narrow stance isn’t stable enough to resist being pushed around in the wind.

To establish a stable base for your stroke take a stance width that is at least as wide as your shoulders (Figure 4.10.13) as measured from the centerline of your

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 103 shoes to the center of each shoulder. Even wider stances are okay but narrower is not.

If stability continues to be a problem you might borrow something from Arnold Palmer who established a very solid base for his putting stroke by standing knock-kneed (Figure 4.10.14). With his knees turned in Arnold absolutely could not move his lower body. However most golfers I suggest this to seem embarrassed to use it which is too had because it works.

104 The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics

Opening or closing your stance by moving your feet off the flow-line is accept able but not recommended. Because your stance can affect your shoulder align ment and the line of your shoulders is vital to good putting I normally recom mend setting the feet square. Of course it is possible to move your feet open or closed without moving your shoulders. Just be sure your shoulder flow-line re mains parallel-left to your Aimline.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Many other grips are possible including the “open palm ” “left-hand-low ” “claw ” “fingertip ” and “equal-pressure” grips. How to best use these and other grips will be discussed in section 11.6 along with how you can develop the best grip for your putting stroke.

Lower-Body Motion and Looking

Almost all golfers unknowingly move their bodies during the putting stroke. Sometimes a lot usually just a little but almost always some which tells me it must be extremely difficult to eliminate (at least without hours and hours of practice). Try rotating your lower body around your spine in your putting address position and you will see it turns your upper body as well (especially your shoulders arms and putter) because your upper body is sitting on the lower (Figure 4.10.18). This also rotates your putterface angle adding an unknown uncontrollable and unwanted variable to the starting line of your putts.

Rotation isn’t the only lower-body motion to avoid. Some golfers sway back and forth as they putt (Figure 4.10.19). They probably don’t know they’re doing it but the ball doesn’t care what you do or don’t know. One forward inch of sway during a stroke will move your ball about one foot on the green. And that ‘s a foot you probably did not plan on.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 107

A different kind of move is the “peek ” in which the golfer both turns and looks up in the middle of his stroke in an attempt to see the result. Probably the most famous peek was at the 1970 British Open at St. Andrews when Doug Sanders (Figure 4.10.20) missed a 2½-foot putt to drop into a tie with Jack Nicklaus who then beat him in the playoff.

4.11 Putter Fitting

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Sandford Springs Golf Club

This is the final setup position. The back is still straight. All you need to do is bend at the waist until the club touches the ground. As you can see, the arms are still stretched out, and the hands are hanging straight down from the shoulders. They seem lower than waist-level, but the relationship between the arms and chest has not changed. Your legs remain in a fixed position, while you move the arms and chest together to the ball. This is the key to a good, simple setup.

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