Richmond Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Richmond Golf Club

About Richmond Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Richmond Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Richmond Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Richmond Golf Club

Richmond is a wonderful course that has the distinction of having been designed by esteemed golf course architect, Frank Pennink, a well respected course designer who helped shape and influence the development and progression of course design in the twentieth century.This course was first opened in 1892 and is built upon exceptional, luscious, verdant parkland, making for a very impressive and aesthetically pleasant place to enjoy a round of golf. It is a beautiful undulating parkland course, offering a hugely enjoyable golfing challenge midst some superb North Yorkshire scenery.Richmond Golf Club is rightly proud of the reputation of it’s course but also the friendly, easy going and extremely hospitable clubhouse.6073 Yrds.

Richmond Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

9.4 Simple Experiments Say Perhaps Yes

You probably could he pushed to agree that it is reasonable to expect golf halls rolling on smooth fast low-friction surfaces (such as a desktop) to be blown sideways by wind. Prove it to yourself by running the “desk wind test ” shown in Figure 9.4.1. Roll a golf ball across your desktop five times to get the feel of where the ball rolls on its own. Then roll it five more times blowing on the ball from the side each time as it passes your face. On at least one of the rolls you’ll hit the ball with your exhaled breath (you’ll miss above or below a few times too) and see it pushed off-line. Once you get the hang of hitting the ball with your breath you can prove to yourself that winds with against and quartering across the line of the rolling ball can have an effect too (Figure 9.4.2).

In the examples and figures above my breath wind speed was about 10 miles per hour which shows that even a relatively low-velocity wind influences the roll of the ball dramatically on a low-friction surface. So what does that mean for your putting on fast and slow greens?

Wind Lopsided Balls Dimples Rain Sleet and Snow 197

To help you understand what really happens to a ball rolling on a flat putting green surface look at Figure 9.4.3. You can see the forces that control the motion of the ball and a simple evaluation of the strength of those forces will tell you where the ball is going to go.

On a windless day a putt rolls forward with the momentum you provided by putting it. As it rolls toward the hole friction against the green surface and air resistance (which is small but does count) slows it down. On a flat green there is no force pushing the ball sideways no downhill component of gravity and no force preventing it from being pushed sideways.

Richmond Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Methods of Putting 39 doing everything as much as he could the same except bringing both feet to the same side of the target line. Snead continued to putt this way until the end of his competitive career and his creation is I believe the next-easiest way to putt.

Just as with croquet-style Sam found that putting sidesaddle allowed him to bend over slightly and look down the line of his putt. But more important it still did away with the breakdown of his wrists. I’m sure golf’s grand pooh-bahs didn’t like what they saw but either they couldn’t figure out a way to outlaw the sidesaddle technique without getting sued or maybe they didn’t have the heart to drive Sam out of the game. Thank heavens they didn’t because it was wonderful watching him play the game even putting from the side for all those years.

Another Variation on a Theme

Someone else started with Snead’s sidesaddle style and made a modification of his own which produced the best putting I’ve seen to this day. Rather than using a standard-length (roughly 35-inch) putter a fellow came to me putting sidesaddle but with a longer-than-normal (about 42-inch) putter (Figure 3.3.3). He stood beside the putting line facing the hole and swung the putter along a perfect vertical pendulum with his top hand and the top of the putter tucked under his armpit. He leaned over to set his eyes directly over the putting line then balanced his weight by extending one foot away from the line.

I can’t remember the name of the man who figured this out but I give him credit: He found something that really does work. He started every putt by standing directly behind the ball and pointed from his ball to a spot out in front of it on his intended starting line. Then he addressed the ball and again pointed down the line to make sure he was aligned correctly. Finally he stroked the ball and held his finish pointing at the same spot again exactly down the putt starting line.

This technique produced the consistently best putting I’ve ever seen and it is legal. But I’m certain that if someone switches to this style and starts winning with it the USGA probably will ban it.

One of the tenets of the USGA the ruling body of golf is to protect and maintain the integrity of the game in part by preserving its challenge and difficulty. I support this noble purpose and think most golfers feel the same way. If we lost the challenge in the game it wouldn’t be nearly so much fun. Having said that we all want to make our own putting strokes simpler so we can hole more putts score better and enjoy the game to its fullest.

Richmond Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Richmond Golf Club

Here is a view from the front. The goal of this photo is to show that there is no lateral movement. Simply rotating your right shoulder around your spine.*Please note that you should NOT be cocking your wrists at the end of your backswing. While this may add a bit of power, it will totally throw off your timing. The results of a wrist cock are slices, hooks, fat shots, etc.

Richmond Golf Club