Queens Park Bournemouth Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Queens Park Bournemouth Golf Club

About Queens Park Bournemouth Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Queens Park Bournemouth Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Queens Park Bournemouth Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Queens Park Bournemouth Golf Club

There are many benefits in choosing Queen’s Park, including: Pay & Play or Membership, whichever suits you best, No handicap required, Advance booking available to guarantee your tee-off time, Centrally located just off the A338 Wessex Way on the edge of Bournemouth, Free Car Parking What a great place to enjoy some fresh air, wonderful scenery and have a game of golf with your friends and colleagues. Queen’s Park is a good test of golf!!

Queens Park (Bournemouth) Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

“Safety-Drawback” (rules in Figure 13.2.5) is a drill that you can play as a game designed to sharpen your touch on putts of less than 35 feet. The purpose is to exercise the ability of your mind’s eye to recognize the stroke needed to produce the perfect putting speed and distance to optimize your chances of holing putts in this range. To develop your touch on these “makable” putts you want to play Safety-

Rules of the Game

Drawback (DB):

Safety-Drawback (SDB):

Double-Safety-Drawback (DSDB):

Develop Your Artistic Senses (Feel Touch Green-Reading) 309

Queens Park Bournemouth Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

A number of very fine players putt with what I call the “power stroke ” by which I mean a stroke in which the power comes from the muscles of the hands wrists or forearms. Some power-strokers use their wrist muscles hinging their wrists the way Arnold Palmer did very successfully in the early part of his career (Figure 3.5.2). Another power-stroker Tiger Woods doesn’t break his wrists but supplies power with his arm muscles (Figure 3.5.3).

Both Arnold and Tiger like to force things to happen to control their putts and make them do what they want them to do. And we all know that they both have so much talent they perform this way very well. I think however they would both putt better if they used less hit and more stroke in their putting motions. (What do I mean? Have you ever seen Arnold or Tiger blow a short putt four feet past the hole? That’s what I mean.)

No matter what provides the power there are two big drawbacks to a power stroke. First is the likelihood of a “power surge ” which can be caused by adrenaline resulting from anxiety or excitement; this significantly degrades the touch of most players under pressure. Second is the uncertainty of controlling the wrist hinge if there is one when the muscles are tight under pressure. Either way consistency usually suffers.

Methods of Putting 43

Next down the easiness scale comes the “pop stroke ” which was used quite successfully by both Gary Player and Johnny Miller early in their careers. The backstroke is shorter than normal and there’s virtually no follow-through after impact so the ball is “popped ” or jabbed forward (Figure 3.5.4). Neither Miller nor Player stuck with the pop stroke through his career because they said it lacked consistency; when I’ve asked them about this method neither would recommend it. However both won many tournaments popping their putts so it may not be as bad as they recall.

The pop stroke does have one advantage and that is it keeps the putterface angle essentially square at all times which is a good thing. However it uses the muscles of the hands and arms for power and is therefore a difficult method to use if you want to develop really good touch.

One of the more interesting putting techniques in golf history is the so-called “hook stroke” of the great South African Bobby Locke who won more than 80 tournaments worldwide between the 1930s and ’50s including four British Opens. Many golfers have told me that Locke put hook spin on his putts which made them dive into the hole. That may have been what both they and Locke thought but I’m sure it was not the case.

Queens Park Bournemouth Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Queens Park Bournemouth Golf Club

This is the final setup position. The back is still straight. All you need to do is bend at the waist until the club touches the ground. As you can see, the arms are still stretched out, and the hands are hanging straight down from the shoulders. They seem lower than waist-level, but the relationship between the arms and chest has not changed. Your legs remain in a fixed position, while you move the arms and chest together to the ball. This is the key to a good, simple setup.

Queens Park Bournemouth Golf Club