Perivale Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Perivale Park Golf Club

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Golf Lessons at Perivale Park Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Perivale Park Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

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The public golf courses in this borough are maintained by the parks and countryside service. Anyone can use these courses and you can become a member for a small yearly fee.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

How do you know whether or not you’d putt better with a long-shafted putter (Figure 11.6.4)? Give one a try and not for just two or three putts. Work with one for several half-hour sessions. The long putter offers several advantages over ones of standard length: There’s no breakdown of the wrist joint during the stroke and there’s no rotating of the forearms so golfers are less likely to try controlling the putterface.

I also like the long putter because it looks something like the pendulum of a grandfather clock so it helps golfers understand the concept of the pendulum motion. It’s for this reason we use long putters (in one session) in my Scoring

Establish Your Practice Framework 247

Game Schools. We have every student swing a long putter as a way of seeing and feeling pure pendulum motion. We also have every student try putting with one. Having done this with many thousands of students we’ve seen a very interesting result: In every school students hole more short putts (inside six feet) with a long putter than with any other type of putter or putting method.

I never try to convert golfers to a long putter because I believe everyone should putt with the shaft length with which they hole the most putts. But I do believe all golfers should at least give a long putter a try. It’s good to feel the rhythm of the pendulum motion and many golfers actually improve their putting with standard-length putters after spending some time putting with the long one (because they can easily feel the pendulum motion and rhythm and experience putting without any wrist motion or breakdown which helps their normal putting motion).

Minimize Hand Control

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

In my first book on putting Putt Like the Pros which was published about 10 years ago I pointed out that a pure-in-line stroke path along the Aimline was the easiest most natural and best putter path to use (Figure 4.6.4). However it turns out that many golfers including some golf professionals never read or understood the concepts that determined this to be a natural motion and continue to believe and teach that the putter should swing around the body in the screen-door semicircular motion as shown in Figure 4.6.5. To understand why the in-line stroke motion is the simplest way to putt you must first understand the mechanics of the way pendulums swing. Three pendu

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 75 lums are illustrated in Figure 4.6.6. Each is swinging from a fixed point with pendulum A swinging vertically below its suspension point describing a back-andforth in-line path along a straight line. Pendulum B is swinging at a 20-degree angle to the vertical supported by a small force shown by arrow B and describing a curved path around the spot directly below its suspension point. Pendulum C is swinging at the opposite 20-degree angle supported by arrow C in a curved motion in the opposite direction around the spot below its suspension point.

All three pendulums are describing pure pendulum motions (the pendulum rhythm will be discussed in section 6.3) which occur in a gravitational field such as that found on Earth. But only pendulum A swings with gravity helping to determine its straight in-line path without any rotation or curvature of the swing path. As you can see both pendulums B and C require outside forces to keep them moving in circular motions.

Now relate these pendulums to putting strokes by attaching putters to the bottom of each pendulum. Pendulum B is what Harvey Penick prescribed: The golfer’s hands hang outside of his shoulder line (the suspension point) at some angle supported by the force B (shown by Justin Leonard in Figure 4.6.7). This puller will describe a curved path around the body like a screen door as long as no hand or arm muscles prevent it from doing so.

In Figure 4.6.8 Fuzzy Zoeller simulates pendulum C by holding his hands inside of his shoulders and at an angle to his suspension point. This putter clearly rotates from outside the Aimline going back to outside the Aimline on the follow-through (the opposite of the screen-door rotation of pendulum B). Again this is a natural pendulum motion but it requires a small force (C) to keep his hands and his I5-degree angle to the vertical below the suspension point.

In these two examples of pendulums B and C it is clear that small side forces are required to make these strokes acceptable for putting and both strokes involve curved paths rotating around the golfer’s body. Now look at pendulum A as a putting stroke which involves no side force or curving path.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 77

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Perivale Park Golf Club

Wrap your right fingers lightly around the handle of the club Alternative to the interlock grip (The overlap grip)

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