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Golf Lessons at Penrhos Golf & Country Club

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Golf Lessons at Penrhos Golf & Country Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

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Penrhos Golf & Country Club

Picture 150 acres of lush green countryside in the Wyre Valley in West Wales – and then imagine a unique country club and golf complex complete with its own luxury American-style hotel in the midst of this beautiful setting.This is Penrhos – a no-expense spared, high quality holiday destination for all the family . . . but designed with the golfer in mind.

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Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

This is another one of those times when I sympathize with golfers because their instinct – to work on line rather than speed – seems to make sense. Why? Because it is easier to see errors in line than errors in speed. Figure 8.2.1 shows three ball tracks for a straight putt rolled at the same speed but started on different Aimlines. Most golfers with any experience would probably correctly diagnose these three putts as a push one struck perfectly and a pull. It’s instinct because it’s easy to see: Ball goes right of the target it’s a push; ball goes in it’s perfect; ball goes left it ‘s a pull.

While realizing that you pulled or pushed your putt off your intended line is an instinctive and natural reaction golfers take it too far. They get overconcerned and overfocused on the direction thereby becoming what we call “line-locked” over their putts. They get so concerned about line that they forget how fast or how far the putt needs to roll. As often as not they leave putts short of the hole rolling them on-line but at the wrong speed.

Getting”line-locked” is a serious problem. And the best way I know to correct it is to prove to you that there are always several Aimlines your ball can follow and still find the hole. Why is this true? Because the hole is 4.25 inches wide the ball is only 1.68 inches in diameter (Figure 8.2.2) and different putt speeds will always give you a choice of ball tracks (unless it is one of those few dead-straight putts in

Speed Is More Important Than Line 183 which case it will roll straight at any speed). Because the ball is much less than half the size of the hole even straight putts offer a choice of makable Aimlines since you can aim a little to the left a little to the right or dead in the middle and still find the hole (Figure 8.2.3).

There are even more Aimline choices on breaking putts than on straight putts. As explained in Chapter 7 starting on any Aimline the faster you roll your putt the less it will break; and the slower you roll a putt the more it will break. So you can choose a very high line and roll the ball so slowly that it breaks madly down the slope and just dribbles over the top edge of the cup. Or you can play a low closer-to-straight Aimline and drill your putt into the cup hoping to catch the back edge squarely to avoid the chance of a lip-out (Figure 8.2.4). And then there are countless combinations of Aimlines and speeds in between: a little higher with a little slower roll; a little lower with a little more speed. The choices are almost endless even on a relatively short putt.

So there are choices and lots of them. But what you will learn in section 8.6 is that for every putt there is always one optimum speed and one optimum Aimline (which means one optimum ball track Figure 8.2.5) for holing the maximum percentage of putts from that distance on that green.

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 71

4.6 Putter Path Is a Small Factor

I’m fairly sure there are almost as many different putting paths as there are golfers. And it seems there are as many ways to stand over (address) a putt too. Even for the same golfer each day’s stroke path seems to he different from the last with some golfers changing their paths from straight to breaking putts and changing again from a right-to-left breaker to a left-to-right breaker. Common sense should tell you that changing this often can’t be a good idea; my putting mantra – “simpler is better” – guarantees that the more different putting strokes you employ the worse your problems on the green.

The most practiced putting fundamental is the putter path. However my testing shows that path is actually one of the least significant factors in good putting. Yet when I ask golfers on the practice green what they are working on the most common answer is always “the path of my putter.”

The direction that the putter is moving at the moment of impact has very little influence on the starting direction of a putt: Assuming you make contact on the putter’s sweetspot the degree of influence is only about 17 percent (Figure 4.6.1). That means if the putterface is square to the intended starting line and the putter moves across that line at a 10-degree angle as it makes contact the ball will start only 1.7 degrees off-line (17 percent times 10 degrees equals 1.7 degrees).

So you can make a large error in your stroke path and see only a small error in the starting line of your putt. Another way to think of it is this: On a dead-straight five-foot putt your path could travel along a line aimed 13 inches left of the hole center and the ball would still hit the left edge (Figure 4.6.2) assuming you hit the sweetspot and everything else about your stroke was perfect.

As you will see in section 4.8 putterface angle has more effect on the line a pull starts on than does the putter path. But golfers practice putter path because

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Penrhos Golf & Country Club

Now just line everything up with that item and fire away. This method won’t cure all of your alignment problems, but it does give you a simple way to assure that you are on the right path. Many students have the habit of lining up way left or way right of the target. When the ball goes where they are “aiming”, they think they have a problem. If your ball consistently goes left or right of target, but flies straight, then your problem is your alignment. Try this simple method before every shot on the course and you’ll definitely drop a few strokes.

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