Paxhill Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Paxhill Park Golf Club

About Paxhill Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Paxhill Park Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Paxhill Park Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Paxhill Park Golf Club

Paxhill Park Golf Club is hidden away in ‘Bluebell Railway’ country and surrounded by sites of outstanding natural beauty, bordered on its southerly side by the Sussex Ouse. Hard-to-locate but close to Haywards Heath, it is an exquisitely photogenic downside course, originally designed by Patrick Tallack in 1989.

Paxhill Park Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

Some golfers even roll the right forearm over after starting with their forearms level (Figure 4.10.10). This happens because they rotate their forearms for every other shot in golf and it feels like the natural thing to do in their putting stroke too. Watch out for this trap! There is absolutely no reason to try to supply power or directional control to your putter from the rotation of your forearms. If you let your forearms swing back and through straight down the line and imagine main taining your forearms ‘ perfect parallel-left alignment you ll feel a perfectly natural putting stroke. And the back of your left hand and your putterface will remain square to your intended line at all times.

Eyes Hips Knees and Feet

The alignment of your eyes hips knees and feet flow-lines is important to your putting only in as much as they affect your brain or the orientation of your shoulder and forearm flow-lines. The problem is they can and do affect them for some golfers.

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 101

I say affect your brain because your eyes process information and feed it to your brain at all times. If you perceive that you need to push your putt out to the right because your eye flow-line is aimed too far left then your brain will make your body do it. When you are trying to perceive distance your eye-line should he horizontal in the binocular position (the way we usually look at things with our head up) to enhance depth perception (left side of Figure 4.10.H). However when you are looking along your Aimline to perceive the flow motion of your putter and ball along it your eye-line should he parallel-left (Figure 4.10.11 right).

As for your hip knee and feet flow-lines there is no reason I know of to have them aligned in any direction other than the intended flow direction of your putts. Some golfers tell me they see the line better when they stand open to their putts but when I test how well they are seeing the line it is usually pretty poorly. Look at Figure 4.10.12 and decide for yourself: Which setup do you think will produce better and more consistent putter flow down the Aimline?

Paxhill Park Golf Club

The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

Standing behind the ball trying to read the green most golfers decide how much they think the putt is going to break and then where they are going to aim. They select a point or a direction where they intend to start their putt and we refer to the line from the ball to that point or direction as the “Aimline ” or desired initial starting line of the putt (Figure 4.1.3). It’s best called the Aimline because it is the line along which you align your body feet and (it’s hoped) your stroke because you want to start the ball rolling along that line. It ‘s where you’re aiming. If everything was figured properly the ball starts on your Aimline and will roll the proper speed and break (because of the slope of the green) gently into the cup.

The entire path that your putt takes is the “ball track” (left side of Figure 4.1.4). It may remind you of the “action track” sometimes used on television to show how a ball has traveled. The distances between the balls on the track indicate how fast (relatively) the putt is traveling: Farther apart means it is rolling faster; closer together and it is rolling slower. A detailed ball track provides an accurate understanding of a putt’s entire motion – both where and how fast it was going – better even than the same putt recorded and played back on videotape.

The amount or size of the “break” played on a putt is a measure of the difference between the direction you aim and start the putt rolling and where you want it to go. We define the amount of break as the distance between the Aimline (up by the hole) and the nearest edge of the hole measured along a line between the two (right side of Figure 4.1.4). The actual amount the ball breaks (curves) is something different because the ball track ideally curves into the center of the hole. But golfers refuse to deal with that detail. When golfers say they are playing one inch of break what they mean is that their Aimline passes one inch outside the edge of the hole as shown in Figure 4.1.5. Technically they expect the putt to break 3¼ inches – one inch plus half the diameter of the hole (2½ inches) – but they insist on thinking and saying that they are playing one inch of break.

Golfers the world over have made a tacit agreement to think of break as measured from the edge of the hole rather than the center. Unless the putt breaks less than half the width of the hole. Then we refer to it as breaking from somewhere inside the cup such as an “inside left edge” or “right center ” to the center of the hole. Only then do we acknowledge that our target is the center of the hole.

Let’s be sure that you understand the terms I’ve defined so far. You’ve cleaned your ball on the green and replaced it in front of your mark. Standing behind your ball on the ball-hole line you realize that if you putt directly along that line it will break to the left and miss below the hole. So you move slightly downhill from the

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 57 ball-hole line and try to imagine how far uphill to the right you must start your putt if you want to make it. You select an Aimline which runs about 28 inches outside the right edge of the hole you walk to the ball set up perfectly along your new Aimline and make practice strokes until ready. You execute the perfect stroke and your ball starts exactly on your Aimline. You guessed the right amount of break (28 inches) and gave your putt the perfect speed so as it rolls it breaks gently to the left and into the center of the cup. Your ball track formed the perfect arc (Figure 4.1.6) the ball entered the exact center of the hole (centered relative to the ball track) and all is right with the world.

4.2 Stroke Definitions

Paxhill Park Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Paxhill Park Golf Club

At this point the right wrist is completely on top of the left wrist. Your hands are “through the ball”. You have continued to rotate around your spine, and you have tried to stop the left elbow on the imaginary line. This is the primary action for amateur golfer to increase power, while reducing slice.

Paxhill Park Golf Club