Padbrook Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Padbrook Park Golf Club

About Padbrook Park Golf Club

Golf Lessons at Padbrook Park Golf Club

Golf Swing Tips

To improve your golf game, it’s vital that you take golf lessons. Golf is a sport that is almost impossible to learn without some sort of guidance. Luckily, there are golf experts around the country whose job it is to teach golf. By taking golf lessons, you can drastically improve your game in a relatively short amount of time. Taking golf lessons can be an expensive, time-consuming effort. And like any good or service that will cost money and require time, you should be careful before you buy.  Golf can be a really costly game to play and it is reasonable to assume that you have invested a fair amount of money in your equipment – golf clubs, golf bag, golf balls, golf clothing, golf cart etc; – therefore doesn’t it make common sense for you to learn how to use them to their advantage and improve your skills and capabilities?

Visit Padbrook Park Golf Club for golf lessons and other info. on golf.

Padbrook Park Golf Club

Established in 1992, this 9-hole/18 tee parkland course (6108 yards, PAR 70, SSS 69) features extensive water and woodland hazards and its large tees and greens have been constructed for all year round play.The Course is affiliated to both the County and National Golfing Unions and Professionals Robert Thorpe and Richard Coffin are available by prior appointment for advice, lessons and club repairs.The Course is supported by a putting green, practice bunker and chipping area, which may be used by all visiting golfers. Limited club and trolley hire is also available from the shop, as well as a number of buggies.

Padbrook Park Golf Club

Dave Pelz’s Putting Bible – golf’s least understood skill.

Extract from the book:

5.4 The Dead-Hands Stroke

The alternative to “hitting”your putts is to”stroke” them. And the ultimate stroke is a pendulum stroke which requires “dead hands” to make it a pure pendulum. A pure pendulum stroke is the weakest least powerful swing in golf. When you first try it you will probably feel insecure as if you can’t get the ball to the hole so you’ll probably leave every putt short. You also will feel as if you don’t have control of the ball. Of course no golfer truly ever has total control of the ball: You can only start a putt on the proper line at the proper speed. Thinking you can do anything else classifies you as a dreamer.

So not being able to control the putt is not a negative; rather it is a truth of the game. Trying to control your putts with a hitting action may make you feel good in the short run but ultimately it degrades your putting. On the other hand not trying to control your putting – using a dead-hands stroke – is a positive action because it is pressure-proof. No matter how strong the muscles of your fingers hands and wrist become due to adrenaline if you don’t use them they won’t hurt your putting feel or touch. If you let the length of your swing starting with the length of your backswing determine the length of the roll of your putts and you perform your stroke in

Five Nonphysical Building Blocks: Touch Feel Attitude Routine and Ritual 119 your personal body rhythm (more on this in section 6.5) then you can learn excellent putting touch and control of your putts’ speed and distance. Look at the putting stroke of Senior Tour player George Archer (Figure 5.4.1). George not only produces a nearly perfect pendulum stroke – as you can see in the consistency of the arm-to-wrists angle in three positions of the stroke (backswing impact and end of follow-through) – but he also uses a pendulum rhythm. George’s pure-in-line-square putting stroke is one of the best you’ll ever see.

The major advantage of the dead-hands stroke is the elimination of the hand and wrist muscles which leads to the subsequent absence of any adrenaline effects. But there are two more reasons to recommend it. Because it is the weakest swing in golf it requires much longer strokes for longer putts than the hit stroke. That means it will be easier to learn to control the length of the roll by the length of the stroke. And since the wrist muscles aren’t used for power they become more sensitive to the feel (kinesthetics) of the stroke.

A Dead-Hands Advantage

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The Long Drive Bible: How You Can Hit the Ball Longer, Straighter, and More Consistently

Extract from the book:

The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics 67

If you don ‘t learn to aim correctly then no one (myself and my Scoring Game Schools included) will ever be able to teach you a good putting stroke. A good putting stroke with bad aim will miss every time and your subconscious will never let you learn a stroke that it knows will miss every time. Instead you ‘ll begin compensating. However once you learn to aim accurately along the Aimline you choose your putting instincts will lead you to make better less compensating strokes and that leads to holing more putts.

4.5 Power Source

Your power source is the part of your body that supplies the power to control and move the putter through the impact zone of your stroke. The muscles you use to control your putter determine your putting power source. The three most common power sources used in putting are: (1) the small muscles of the fingers hands wrists and forearms; (2) the arms and shoulders; and (3) body motion.

Fingers Hands and Wrists

Most golfers control their putting with the small muscles of their hands wrists and forearms. These are the muscles that control most of the things we do in life – hitting things twisting things moving things – so using our hands and forearms in golf is instinctive and therefore feels natural to us. But instinct and natu

68 The Seven Building Blocks of Stroke Mechanics ralness don’ t necessarily mean correct. And in fact trying to find a way to putt that is both initially comfortable and natural usually leads to disaster.

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Golf Swing Tips

The “Simple Golf” Swing: “Golf for the Rest of Us”

Extract from the book:

Golf Tuition Padbrook Park Golf Club

This is a different view of the complete follow through. Your forearms are crossed, and that is the sign that you have completed the follow-through correctly Keep your head perfectly still during the entire swing This is the last crucial step that you must master. It’s by far the easiest step, but ironically it will produce the most results. The biggest problem is that you don’t always know when you are moving your head. You may find that swinging easier helps keep the head still, but other than that it is just something that you will have to really concentrate on.

Padbrook Park Golf Club